Inequality at risk of automation? Gender differences in routine tasks intensity in developing country labor markets

J. Pieters, A. Kujundzic, Rulof Burger, Joel Gondwe

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterProfessional

Abstract

Technological change can have profound impacts on the labor market. Decades of research have made it clear that technological change produces winners and losers. Machines can replace some types of work that humans do, while new
technologies increase human’s productivity in other types of work. For a long time, highly educated workers benefitted from increased demand for their labor due to skill-biased technological change, while the losers were concentrated at
the bottom of the wage distribution Katz and Autor, 1999; Goldin and Katz, 2007, 2010; Kijima, 2006. Currently, however, labor markets seem to be affected by a different type of technological change, the so-called routine-biased technological change (RBTC).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCracking the future of work
Subtitle of host publicationAutomation and labor platforms in the Global South
EditorsRamiro Albrieu
Chapter2
Pages82-147
Number of pages66
ISBN (Electronic)9789871479511
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2021

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