Industrial processing versus home processing of tomato sauce: Effects on phenolics, flavonoids and in vitro bioaccessibility of antioxidants

Merve Tomas, Jules Beekwilder, Robert D. Hall, Osman Sagdic, Dilek Boyacioglu, Esra Capanoglu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of industrial and home processing, in vitro gastrointestinal digestion, individual phenolic content, and antioxidant capacity of tomato into tomato sauce were investigated. Industrial processing of tomato fruit into sauce had an overall positive effect on the total antioxidant capacity (∼1.2-fold higher) compared to tomato fruit whereas home processing of tomato fruit into sauce led to a decrease in these values. Untargeted LC–QTOF-MS analysis revealed 31 compounds in tomato that changed upon processing, of which 18 could be putatively identified. Naringenin chalcone is only detectable in the fruit, while naringenin is strongly increased in the sauces. Rutin content increased by 36% in the industrial processed sauce whereas decreased by 26% in the home processed sauce when compared to fruit. According to the results of an in vitro gastrointestinal digestion model, industrial processing may lead to enhanced bioaccessibility of antioxidants.

LanguageEnglish
Pages51-58
JournalFood Chemistry
Volume220
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Fingerprint

tomato sauce
sauces
Lycopersicon esculentum
Fruits
processing technology
Flavonoids
flavonoids
Antioxidants
tomatoes
Fruit
antioxidants
fruits
Processing
naringenin
digestion
Digestion
chalcone
Rutin
rutin
In Vitro Techniques

Keywords

  • Antioxidant
  • Bioavailability
  • In vitro gastrointestinal digestion
  • Processing
  • Tomato sauce

Cite this

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title = "Industrial processing versus home processing of tomato sauce: Effects on phenolics, flavonoids and in vitro bioaccessibility of antioxidants",
abstract = "The effect of industrial and home processing, in vitro gastrointestinal digestion, individual phenolic content, and antioxidant capacity of tomato into tomato sauce were investigated. Industrial processing of tomato fruit into sauce had an overall positive effect on the total antioxidant capacity (∼1.2-fold higher) compared to tomato fruit whereas home processing of tomato fruit into sauce led to a decrease in these values. Untargeted LC–QTOF-MS analysis revealed 31 compounds in tomato that changed upon processing, of which 18 could be putatively identified. Naringenin chalcone is only detectable in the fruit, while naringenin is strongly increased in the sauces. Rutin content increased by 36{\%} in the industrial processed sauce whereas decreased by 26{\%} in the home processed sauce when compared to fruit. According to the results of an in vitro gastrointestinal digestion model, industrial processing may lead to enhanced bioaccessibility of antioxidants.",
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Industrial processing versus home processing of tomato sauce : Effects on phenolics, flavonoids and in vitro bioaccessibility of antioxidants. / Tomas, Merve; Beekwilder, Jules; Hall, Robert D.; Sagdic, Osman; Boyacioglu, Dilek; Capanoglu, Esra.

In: Food Chemistry, Vol. 220, 2017, p. 51-58.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Industrial processing versus home processing of tomato sauce

T2 - Food Chemistry

AU - Tomas, Merve

AU - Beekwilder, Jules

AU - Hall, Robert D.

AU - Sagdic, Osman

AU - Boyacioglu, Dilek

AU - Capanoglu, Esra

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - The effect of industrial and home processing, in vitro gastrointestinal digestion, individual phenolic content, and antioxidant capacity of tomato into tomato sauce were investigated. Industrial processing of tomato fruit into sauce had an overall positive effect on the total antioxidant capacity (∼1.2-fold higher) compared to tomato fruit whereas home processing of tomato fruit into sauce led to a decrease in these values. Untargeted LC–QTOF-MS analysis revealed 31 compounds in tomato that changed upon processing, of which 18 could be putatively identified. Naringenin chalcone is only detectable in the fruit, while naringenin is strongly increased in the sauces. Rutin content increased by 36% in the industrial processed sauce whereas decreased by 26% in the home processed sauce when compared to fruit. According to the results of an in vitro gastrointestinal digestion model, industrial processing may lead to enhanced bioaccessibility of antioxidants.

AB - The effect of industrial and home processing, in vitro gastrointestinal digestion, individual phenolic content, and antioxidant capacity of tomato into tomato sauce were investigated. Industrial processing of tomato fruit into sauce had an overall positive effect on the total antioxidant capacity (∼1.2-fold higher) compared to tomato fruit whereas home processing of tomato fruit into sauce led to a decrease in these values. Untargeted LC–QTOF-MS analysis revealed 31 compounds in tomato that changed upon processing, of which 18 could be putatively identified. Naringenin chalcone is only detectable in the fruit, while naringenin is strongly increased in the sauces. Rutin content increased by 36% in the industrial processed sauce whereas decreased by 26% in the home processed sauce when compared to fruit. According to the results of an in vitro gastrointestinal digestion model, industrial processing may lead to enhanced bioaccessibility of antioxidants.

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KW - Bioavailability

KW - In vitro gastrointestinal digestion

KW - Processing

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