Induced parasitoid attraction by Arabidopsis thaliana : involvement of the octadecanoid and the salicylic acid pathway

M.P. van Poecke, M. Dicke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

116 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Plants can use indirect defence mechanisms to protect themselves against herbivorous insects. An example of such an indirect defence mechanism is the emission of volatiles by plants induced by herbivore feeding. These volatiles can attract the natural enemies of these herbivores, for example, parasitoid wasps. Here, it is shown that the octadecanoid and the salicylic acid pathways are involved in the induced attraction of the parasitoid wasp Cotesia rubecula by Arabidopsis thaliana infested with the herbivore Pieris rapae. Besides exogenous application of jasmonic acid or salicylic acid, use is also made of transgenic Arabidopsis that do not show induced jasmonic acid levels after wounding (S-12) and transgenic Arabidopsis that do not accumulate salicylic acid (NahG). Treatment of Arabidopsis with jasmonic acid resulted in an increased attraction of parasitoid wasps compared with untreated plants, whereas treatment with salicylic acid did not. Transgenic plants impaired in the octadecanoid or the salicylic acid pathway were less attractive than wild-type plants.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1793-1799
JournalJournal of Experimental Botany
Volume53
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

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