Individual differences in texture preferences among European children: Development and validation of the Child Food Texture Preference Questionnaire (CFTPQ)

M. Laureati*, P. Sandvik, V.L. Almli, M. Sandell, G.G. Zeinstra, L. Methven, M. Wallner, H. Jilani, B. Alfaro, C. Proserpio

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Texture has an important role in children's acceptance and rejection of food. However, little is known about individual differences in texture preference. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a child-friendly tool to explore individual differences in texture preferences in school-aged children from six European countries (Austria, Finland, Italy, Spain, Sweden and United Kingdom). Six hundred and ten children aged 9–12 years and their parents participated in a cross-sectional study. Children completed the Child Food Texture Preference Questionnaire (CFTPQ) and a Food Neophobia Scale (FNS). The CFTPQ consisted in asking children to choose the preferred item within 17 pairs of pictures of food varying in texture (hard vs. soft or smooth vs. lumpy). Children also evaluated all food items for familiarity. Parents completed the CFTPQ regarding their preferred items, a food frequency questionnaire for their child, and provided background information. For a subset of children, a re-test was done for the CFTPQ and FNS to assess reliability. The results showed that the tool was child-friendly, had high test-retest reliability, and identified country-related differences as well as segments of children with different texture preferences (hard- vs. soft-likers). These segments differed in consumption frequency of healthy foods, and in food neophobia.

Original languageEnglish
Article number103828
JournalFood Quality and Preference
Volume80
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2020

Fingerprint

child development
Food Preferences
Child Development
Individuality
questionnaires
texture
Food
Surveys and Questionnaires
Parents
Austria
food frequency questionnaires
Finland

Keywords

  • Cross-cultural
  • Food neophobia
  • Food preferences
  • Texture-liker status
  • Young consumer

Cite this

Laureati, M. ; Sandvik, P. ; Almli, V.L. ; Sandell, M. ; Zeinstra, G.G. ; Methven, L. ; Wallner, M. ; Jilani, H. ; Alfaro, B. ; Proserpio, C. / Individual differences in texture preferences among European children: Development and validation of the Child Food Texture Preference Questionnaire (CFTPQ). In: Food Quality and Preference. 2020 ; Vol. 80.
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Individual differences in texture preferences among European children: Development and validation of the Child Food Texture Preference Questionnaire (CFTPQ). / Laureati, M.; Sandvik, P.; Almli, V.L.; Sandell, M.; Zeinstra, G.G.; Methven, L.; Wallner, M.; Jilani, H.; Alfaro, B.; Proserpio, C.

In: Food Quality and Preference, Vol. 80, 103828, 03.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AU - Laureati, M.

AU - Sandvik, P.

AU - Almli, V.L.

AU - Sandell, M.

AU - Zeinstra, G.G.

AU - Methven, L.

AU - Wallner, M.

AU - Jilani, H.

AU - Alfaro, B.

AU - Proserpio, C.

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