Incentives to stimulate european wheat farmers to adapt their fusarium species mycotoxin management

Esmée M. Janssen, Monique C.M. Mourits, Alfons G.J.M. Oude Lansink, H.J. Van Der Fels-Klerx*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Fusarium species infection in wheat can lead to Fusarium Head Blight (FHB) and contamination with mycotoxins. To fully exploit more recent insights into FHB and mycotoxin management, farmers might need to adapt their agronomic management, which can be stimulated through incentives. This study aimed to identify incentives to stimulate European farmers to adapt their agronomic management to reduce FHB and related mycotoxins in wheat. A questionnaire was distributed among 224 wheat farmers from Italy, the Netherlands, Serbia, and the United Kingdom. Using the respondents' data, Bayesian Network modelling was applied to estimate the probability that farmers would adapt their current agronomic management under eight different incentives given the conditions set by their farm and farmer characteristics. Results show that most farmers would adapt their current agronomic management under the incentives "paid extra when wheat contains low levels of mycotoxins"and "wheat is tested for the presence of mycotoxins for free". The most effective incentive depended on farm and farmer characteristics, such as country, crop type, size of arable land, soil type, education, and mycotoxin knowledge. Insights into the farmer characteristics related to incentives can help stakeholders in the wheat supply chain, such as farmer cooperatives and the government, to design tailor-made incentive plans.

Original languageEnglish
Article number144
JournalToxins
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Feb 2021

Keywords

  • Farmer
  • Fusarium head blight
  • Fusarium spp.
  • Incentive
  • Mycotoxin
  • Wheat

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Incentives to stimulate european wheat farmers to adapt their fusarium species mycotoxin management'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this