Implementation of biocontrol and IPM in Dutch horticulture: A socio-economic and technical innovation process

A.J. de Buck, E.A.M. Beerling

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    The application of biocontrol in Dutch glasshouses has increased tremendously from its rediscovery in the 1960's up to now. In the last decade, the number of different natural enemies sold to Dutch growers increased from 7 in 1992 to 26 in 2001 (LTO Nederland, vakgroep Glastuinbouw, 2003). Integrated pest management (IPM) is practised on a large scale in all main vegetable crops. At the end of the millennium more than 90% of all tomatoes, cucumbers and sweet peppers were produced under IPM in The Netherlands (Van Lenteren, 2000). Also the area of glasshouse ornamentals grown under IPM increased. In 1998 biocontrol was applied in more than 10% of the Dutch ornamental crops (Van Lenteren, 2000). This increase is mainly accounted for by gerberas, roses, orchids and potted plants (LTO Nederland, vakgroep Glastuinbouw, 2003). According to Van Lenteren (2000), natural enemies were released on 78% of the area down to gerberas
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationAn ecological and societal approach to biological control
    EditorsJ. Eilenberg, H.M.T. Hokkanen
    Pages73-90
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2006

    Publication series

    NameProgress in Biological Control
    PublisherSpringer
    Numbervolume 2

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