Impact of sorghum processing on phytate, phenolic compounds and in vitro solubility of iron and zinc in thick porridges

A.P.P. Kayodé, A.R. Linnemann, M.J.R. Nout, M.A.J.S. van Boekel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study focussed on the impact of process variables on levels of phytate and phenolic compounds, and in vitro solubility of iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) in sorghum porridges, a major staple in semi-arid tropics. The aim was to identify practices that enhance the mineral availability in this type of staple food. We studied the example of the West African porridge `dibou' for which the processing methods involve grain cleaning, milling, sieving and cooking. Regional variations occur in the process, particularly in the cleaning which may be done wet or dry; sieving may be omitted in certain locations. Cleaning reduced the phytate content of the grain by 24-39%, while milling, sieving and cooking had no significant effect on phytate. Phenolic compounds measured as levels of reactive hydroxyl groups, remained constant after cleaning, milling and sieving, but significantly decreased by 38-65% after cooking. The Fe solubility tended to increase after cleaning but was drastically reduced due to cooking, and so was the soluble Zn. Levels of total phenolic compounds highly correlated with the Fe and Zn solubility (r2 = 0.73 and 0.82, respectively). Phenolic reaction products formed during the cooking process are presumably related with the extensive browning phenomenon observed in the dibou porridge, and with the reduction observed in Fe and Zn solubility
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)832-838
JournalJournal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
Volume87
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Keywords

  • nutrient
  • cooking
  • cereals
  • digestibility
  • fermentation
  • polyphenols
  • soaking
  • benin
  • seeds

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