Impact of multiple certification on smallholder coffee farmers’ livelihoods: evidence from southern Ethiopia

Amsaya Anteneh Woubie, Roldan Muradian, R. Ruben

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademicpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Coffee is – next to petroleum – one of the most valuable agricultural commodities traded at international markets (Arslan and Reicher, 2010; Rodriquez, 2012). Today, coffee remains one of the most important sources of export income for East African nations (i.e. Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania). Ethiopia is known to be the birthplace and the primary centre of biodiversity of Arabica coffee (Daviron and Ponte, 2005; Labouisse et al., 2008). The main production systems in Ethiopia are forest coffee in the traditional way, semi-forest coffee, garden coffee, and plantation coffee owned by the state (Labouisse et al., 2008; Stellmacher and Grote, 2011). Considering the country’s suitable altitude, rainfall, temperature, and fertile soil, the potential for coffee production in Ethiopia is very high.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCoffee certification in East Africa: impact on farms, families and cooperatives
EditorsRuerd Ruben, Paul Hoebink
PublisherWageningen Academic Publishers
Pages127-148
ISBN (Electronic)9789086868056
ISBN (Print)9789086862559
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Impact of multiple certification on smallholder coffee farmers’ livelihoods: evidence from southern Ethiopia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this