Impact of black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis minor) on a local population of Euphorbia bothae in the Great Fish River Reserve, South Africa

B.L. Luske, T. Mertens, P.C. Lent, W.F. de Boer, H.H.T. Prins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the Great Fish River Reserve, South Africa, black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis minor) feed extensively on a local population of Euphorbia bothae. Maintaining the endangered black rhinoceros and the protected E. bothae population are both conservation priorities of the reserve. Therefore, the sustainability of this plant–animal interaction was investigated by comparing population characteristics, browsing incidence and intensity within the reserve and in an adjacent exclosure without access to rhino. Fixed-point photographs showed that over a 2-month period 36.6% of 213 monitored plants were browsed, with an average biomass loss of 13%, and 1% were destroyed. Of 26 plants re-photographed after approximately 3 years, 70% showed a decrease in biomass, averaging 37.8% over this period. In this time span, 19% of the monitored plants died. Small plants (
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)509-517
JournalAfrican Journal of Ecology
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Diceros bicornis
Euphorbia
South Africa
rivers
fish
river
population characteristics
biomass
browsing
photographs
photograph
sustainability
incidence
Diceros bicornis ssp. minor
Africa

Keywords

  • succulent thicket
  • height structure
  • eastern cape
  • elephant
  • quality
  • herbivory
  • selection
  • browsers
  • dynamics
  • saplings

Cite this

@article{7d880d74f88a4db783b571f166aca65e,
title = "Impact of black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis minor) on a local population of Euphorbia bothae in the Great Fish River Reserve, South Africa",
abstract = "In the Great Fish River Reserve, South Africa, black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis minor) feed extensively on a local population of Euphorbia bothae. Maintaining the endangered black rhinoceros and the protected E. bothae population are both conservation priorities of the reserve. Therefore, the sustainability of this plant–animal interaction was investigated by comparing population characteristics, browsing incidence and intensity within the reserve and in an adjacent exclosure without access to rhino. Fixed-point photographs showed that over a 2-month period 36.6{\%} of 213 monitored plants were browsed, with an average biomass loss of 13{\%}, and 1{\%} were destroyed. Of 26 plants re-photographed after approximately 3 years, 70{\%} showed a decrease in biomass, averaging 37.8{\%} over this period. In this time span, 19{\%} of the monitored plants died. Small plants (",
keywords = "succulent thicket, height structure, eastern cape, elephant, quality, herbivory, selection, browsers, dynamics, saplings",
author = "B.L. Luske and T. Mertens and P.C. Lent and {de Boer}, W.F. and H.H.T. Prins",
year = "2009",
doi = "10.1111/j.1365-2028.2008.00973.x",
language = "English",
volume = "47",
pages = "509--517",
journal = "African Journal of Ecology",
issn = "0141-6707",
publisher = "Wiley",
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Impact of black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis minor) on a local population of Euphorbia bothae in the Great Fish River Reserve, South Africa. / Luske, B.L.; Mertens, T.; Lent, P.C.; de Boer, W.F.; Prins, H.H.T.

In: African Journal of Ecology, Vol. 47, No. 4, 2009, p. 509-517.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

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AU - Mertens, T.

AU - Lent, P.C.

AU - de Boer, W.F.

AU - Prins, H.H.T.

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AB - In the Great Fish River Reserve, South Africa, black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis minor) feed extensively on a local population of Euphorbia bothae. Maintaining the endangered black rhinoceros and the protected E. bothae population are both conservation priorities of the reserve. Therefore, the sustainability of this plant–animal interaction was investigated by comparing population characteristics, browsing incidence and intensity within the reserve and in an adjacent exclosure without access to rhino. Fixed-point photographs showed that over a 2-month period 36.6% of 213 monitored plants were browsed, with an average biomass loss of 13%, and 1% were destroyed. Of 26 plants re-photographed after approximately 3 years, 70% showed a decrease in biomass, averaging 37.8% over this period. In this time span, 19% of the monitored plants died. Small plants (

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KW - elephant

KW - quality

KW - herbivory

KW - selection

KW - browsers

KW - dynamics

KW - saplings

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