Identifying practices of inclusive biobased value chains: Lessons from corn stover in Iowa, sugar cane in Jamaica, and sugar beet in the Netherlands

Zoë Robaey*, Lotte Asveld, Kinsuk M. Sinha, Emiel Wubben, Patricia Osseweijer

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Including local producers of biomass in the process of developing global biobased value chains offers a way to ensure sustainable and reliable production of biomass while also promoting economic fairness. However, many contextual factors influence the design of inclusive bio-based value chains because their technology and feedstock are diverse. Inclusion is therefore not one-size-fits-all, but rather an approach demanding different strategies depending on the value chain. Given such diversity, how can the development of inclusion strategies in bio-based value chain design be supported? Responding to that question, this article examines and analyzes the practices of biorefineries in the United States, Jamaica, and the Netherlands. We propose a means/goals approach to inclusion that can accommodate a variety of value chains. Moreover, we suggest that the concept of inclusion can realize several societal goals ranging from economic justice to managing uncertainties via various institutional arrangements and design means.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)100032
JournalCleaner and Circular Bioeconomy
Volume3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2022

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