Identifying Plasma and Urinary Biomarkers of Fermented Food Intake and Their Associations with Cardiometabolic Health in a Dutch Observational Cohort

Katherine J. Li, Kathryn J. Burton-Pimentel, Elske M. Brouwer-Brolsma, Carola Blaser, René Badertscher, Grégory Pimentel, Reto Portmann, Edith J.M. Feskens, Guy Vergères*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Identification of food intake biomarkers (FIBs) for fermented foods could help improve their dietary assessment and clarify their associations with cardiometabolic health. We aimed to identify novel FIBs for fermented foods in the plasma and urine metabolomes of 246 free-living Dutch adults using nontargeted LC-MS and GC-MS. Furthermore, associations between identified metabolites and several cardiometabolic risk factors were explored. In total, 37 metabolites were identified corresponding to the intakes of coffee, wine, and beer (none were identified for cocoa, bread, cheese, or yoghurt intake). While some of these metabolites appeared to originate from raw food (e.g., niacin and trigonelline for coffee), others overlapped different fermented foods (e.g., 4-hydroxybenzeneacetic acid for both wine and beer). In addition, several fermentation-dependent metabolites were identified (erythritol and citramalate). Associations between these identified metabolites with cardiometabolic parameters were weak and inconclusive. Further evaluation is warranted to confirm their relationships with cardiometabolic disease risk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4426-4439
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume71
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Feb 2023

Keywords

  • biomarkers
  • cardiometabolic health
  • dietary assessment
  • fermented foods
  • metabolomics

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