Identifying effective message-framing techniques in behaviour change communication for healthy diets: An experimental study of promoting biofortified maize adoption in Ethiopia

Kaleb Shiferaw Jada*, Marrit van den Berg

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

There is an increasing interest in using insights from behavioural economics and psychology to influence people's decisions. However, little is known as to how to leverage these insights to inform educational campaigns in the context of nutrition-sensitive agriculture. We help to fill this void by investigating the effect of framed messages (gain vs loss) in stimulating demand for nutritionally enhanced crops. We conducted a field experiment with 648 farmers and found the following key results. First, nutrition education stimulates demand for nutritionally enhanced crops among smallholder farmers. Without nutrition education, farmers are less likely to switch from producing conventional maize to nutritionally enhanced maize. Second, gain-framed messages are slightly more effective: they result in a higher willingness to pay for nutritionally enhanced maize than loss-framed messages. Third, motivational orientations and risk perceptions of individuals moderate the effect of the framed messages.

Original languageEnglish
Article number106263
JournalAppetite
Volume178
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2022

Keywords

  • Field experiment
  • Message framing
  • Nutrition-sensitive agriculture
  • Regulatory fit
  • Risk perception

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