I did good, and we did bad: The impact of collective versus private emotions on pro-environmental food consumption

M.C. Onwezen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Consumers' food consumption patterns are one of the main problems that is associated with environmental concerns. Emotions play an important role in guiding consumers toward pro-environmental consumption, although it is not clear how the functions of emotions that are experienced due to one's own behavior (private emotions) or due to the behavior of groups to which one belongs (collective emotions) compare. We proposed that due to the attribution bias, positive private and negative collective emotions are the most effective in guiding intentions. Indeed, the current paper shows that positive private and negative collective emotions have the strongest effect on intention to buy organic food in the three studies that are described. This paper offers theoretical implications regarding the function of emotions and practical implications that might be used to encourage pro-environmental food consumption.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)261-268
JournalFood Research International
Volume76
Issue numberP2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Keywords

  • Anticipated emotions
  • Environmentally friendly
  • Group-based emotions
  • Pro-social

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