Hot-water treatment before tissue culture reduces initial contamination in Lilium and Acer

Merel Langens-Gerrits, Marion Albers, Geert-Jan de Klerk

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    In 1887, the Danish researcher Jensen used a hot-water treatment (HWT) to free plant tissues from pathogens. Ever since, heat treatments have been used to free plants from viruses, bacteria, fungi, nematodes and insects. In agricultural practice, HWTs are used on a large scale with bulbs, tubers and seeds [1]. The advantages of temperature treatments in comparison with chemical treatments are that there are no chemical residues and also that endogenous pathogens are removed. However, a HWT may damage the host plant [2]. The resistance of plant tissues to HWT strongly depends on their physiological condition, for example size, moisture content, vigour, condition of external layers, temperature conditions during growth, dormancy level, age, and genetic constitution [2].
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationPathogen and Microbial Contamination Management in Micropropagation
    EditorsA.C. Cassells
    Place of PublicationDordrecht
    PublisherSpringer
    Chapter27
    Pages219-224
    ISBN (Electronic)9789401589512
    ISBN (Print)9789048149322
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1997

    Publication series

    NameDevelopments in Plant Pathology
    Volume12
    ISSN (Print)0929-1318

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  • Cite this

    Langens-Gerrits, M., Albers, M., & de Klerk, G-J. (1997). Hot-water treatment before tissue culture reduces initial contamination in Lilium and Acer. In A. C. Cassells (Ed.), Pathogen and Microbial Contamination Management in Micropropagation (pp. 219-224). (Developments in Plant Pathology; Vol. 12). Dordrecht: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-015-8951-2_27