Higher Mediterranean Diet scores are not cross-sectionally associated with better cognitive scores in 20- to 70-year-old Dutch adults: The NQplus study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet (MedDiet) has been suggested to reduce
the risk of age-related cognitive decline. Therefore, we hypothesized that
adults consuming a more Mediterranean-like diet were more likely to have
better cognitive scores. We investigated cross-sectional associations between
MedDiet adherence and cognitive performance using data of 1607 Dutch men
and women aged 20–70 years. Dietary intake was assessed using a 183-item
Food Frequency Questionnaire. MedDiet adherence was defined by a 0–9 point
scale; which was based on intakes of vegetables, legumes, fruits/nuts, cereals,
fish/seafood, meat/poultry, dairy, ethanol and the MUFA:SFA ratio. Cognitive
function was assessed with a neuropsychological test battery. Linear regression
analyses adjusted for relevant covariates showed a significant inverse association
between MedDiet adherence and everyday memory: specifically β = −0.107
± 0.046 points (P = .02) for the total population and β = −0.139 ± 0.055 points
(P = .01) for those aged ≥50 years. Further exploration of the individual MedDiet
food groups suggested that the association between MedDiet and everyday
memory was predominantly driven by the MUFA:SFA ratio. Moreover, associations were observed between higher ethanol intake better semantic memory and language production (β = 0.016 ± 0.008 P = .05), higher
vegetable intake with better processing speed (β = 0.005 ± 0.002, P = .02), and
higher legumes intake with poorer processing speed (β = −0.014 ±0.006, P = 03). Thus, in this Dutch cohort, higher MedDiet adherence was associated with poorer everyday memory.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)80-89
JournalNutrition Research
Volume59
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2018

Fingerprint

Mediterranean Diet
Fabaceae
Vegetables
Ethanol
Food
Seafood
Nuts
Neuropsychological Tests
Poultry
Semantics
Meat
Cognition
Linear Models
Fruit
Fishes
Language
Regression Analysis

Cite this

@article{333aa1935e2a47ab9967996f65dedf67,
title = "Higher Mediterranean Diet scores are not cross-sectionally associated with better cognitive scores in 20- to 70-year-old Dutch adults: The NQplus study",
abstract = "Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet (MedDiet) has been suggested to reduce the risk of age-related cognitive decline. Therefore, we hypothesized that adults consuming a more Mediterranean-like diet were more likely to have better cognitive scores. We investigated cross-sectional associations between MedDiet adherence and cognitive performance using data of 1607 Dutch men and women aged 20–70 years. Dietary intake was assessed using a 183-item Food Frequency Questionnaire. MedDiet adherence was defined by a 0–9 pointscale; which was based on intakes of vegetables, legumes, fruits/nuts, cereals, fish/seafood, meat/poultry, dairy, ethanol and the MUFA:SFA ratio. Cognitive function was assessed with a neuropsychological test battery. Linear regression analyses adjusted for relevant covariates showed a significant inverse association between MedDiet adherence and everyday memory: specifically β = −0.107 ± 0.046 points (P = .02) for the total population and β = −0.139 ± 0.055 points (P = .01) for those aged ≥50 years. Further exploration of the individual MedDiet food groups suggested that the association between MedDiet and everyday memory was predominantly driven by the MUFA:SFA ratio. Moreover, associations were observed between higher ethanol intake better semantic memory and language production (β = 0.016 ± 0.008 P = .05), higher vegetable intake with better processing speed (β = 0.005 ± 0.002, P = .02), and higher legumes intake with poorer processing speed (β = −0.014 ±0.006, P = 03). Thus, in this Dutch cohort, higher MedDiet adherence was associated with poorer everyday memory.",
author = "E.M. Brouwer and Anita Benati and {van de Wiel}, A.M. and {van Lee}, L. and {de Vries}, J.H.M. and E.J.M. Feskens and {van de Rest}, O.",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1016/j.nutres.2018.07.013",
language = "English",
volume = "59",
pages = "80--89",
journal = "Nutrition Research",
issn = "0271-5317",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Higher Mediterranean Diet scores are not cross-sectionally associated with better cognitive scores in 20- to 70-year-old Dutch adults: The NQplus study

AU - Brouwer, E.M.

AU - Benati, Anita

AU - van de Wiel, A.M.

AU - van Lee, L.

AU - de Vries, J.H.M.

AU - Feskens, E.J.M.

AU - van de Rest, O.

PY - 2018/11

Y1 - 2018/11

N2 - Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet (MedDiet) has been suggested to reduce the risk of age-related cognitive decline. Therefore, we hypothesized that adults consuming a more Mediterranean-like diet were more likely to have better cognitive scores. We investigated cross-sectional associations between MedDiet adherence and cognitive performance using data of 1607 Dutch men and women aged 20–70 years. Dietary intake was assessed using a 183-item Food Frequency Questionnaire. MedDiet adherence was defined by a 0–9 pointscale; which was based on intakes of vegetables, legumes, fruits/nuts, cereals, fish/seafood, meat/poultry, dairy, ethanol and the MUFA:SFA ratio. Cognitive function was assessed with a neuropsychological test battery. Linear regression analyses adjusted for relevant covariates showed a significant inverse association between MedDiet adherence and everyday memory: specifically β = −0.107 ± 0.046 points (P = .02) for the total population and β = −0.139 ± 0.055 points (P = .01) for those aged ≥50 years. Further exploration of the individual MedDiet food groups suggested that the association between MedDiet and everyday memory was predominantly driven by the MUFA:SFA ratio. Moreover, associations were observed between higher ethanol intake better semantic memory and language production (β = 0.016 ± 0.008 P = .05), higher vegetable intake with better processing speed (β = 0.005 ± 0.002, P = .02), and higher legumes intake with poorer processing speed (β = −0.014 ±0.006, P = 03). Thus, in this Dutch cohort, higher MedDiet adherence was associated with poorer everyday memory.

AB - Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet (MedDiet) has been suggested to reduce the risk of age-related cognitive decline. Therefore, we hypothesized that adults consuming a more Mediterranean-like diet were more likely to have better cognitive scores. We investigated cross-sectional associations between MedDiet adherence and cognitive performance using data of 1607 Dutch men and women aged 20–70 years. Dietary intake was assessed using a 183-item Food Frequency Questionnaire. MedDiet adherence was defined by a 0–9 pointscale; which was based on intakes of vegetables, legumes, fruits/nuts, cereals, fish/seafood, meat/poultry, dairy, ethanol and the MUFA:SFA ratio. Cognitive function was assessed with a neuropsychological test battery. Linear regression analyses adjusted for relevant covariates showed a significant inverse association between MedDiet adherence and everyday memory: specifically β = −0.107 ± 0.046 points (P = .02) for the total population and β = −0.139 ± 0.055 points (P = .01) for those aged ≥50 years. Further exploration of the individual MedDiet food groups suggested that the association between MedDiet and everyday memory was predominantly driven by the MUFA:SFA ratio. Moreover, associations were observed between higher ethanol intake better semantic memory and language production (β = 0.016 ± 0.008 P = .05), higher vegetable intake with better processing speed (β = 0.005 ± 0.002, P = .02), and higher legumes intake with poorer processing speed (β = −0.014 ±0.006, P = 03). Thus, in this Dutch cohort, higher MedDiet adherence was associated with poorer everyday memory.

U2 - 10.1016/j.nutres.2018.07.013

DO - 10.1016/j.nutres.2018.07.013

M3 - Article

VL - 59

SP - 80

EP - 89

JO - Nutrition Research

JF - Nutrition Research

SN - 0271-5317

ER -