High level of molecular and phenotypic biodiversity in Jatropha curcas from Central America compared to Africa, Asia and South America

L.R. Montes Osorio, A.F. Torres Salvador, R.E.E. Jongschaap, C. Azurdia, J. Berduo, L.M. Trindade, R.G.F. Visser, E.N. van Loo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background The main bottleneck to elevate jatropha (Jatropha curcas L.) from a wild species to a profitable biodiesel crop is the low genetic and phenotypic variation found in different regions of the world, hampering efficient plant breeding for productivity traits. In this study, 182 accessions from Asia (91), Africa (35), South America (9) and Central America (47) were evaluated at genetic and phenotypic level to find genetic variation and important traits for oilseed production. Results Genetic variation was assessed with SSR (Simple Sequence Repeat), TRAP (Target Region Amplification Polymorphism) and AFLP (Amplified fragment length polymorphism) techniques. Phenotypic variation included seed morphological characteristics, seed oil content and fatty acid composition and early growth traits. Jaccard’s similarity and cluster analysis by UPGM (Unweighted Paired Group Method) with arithmetic mean and PCA (Principle Component Analysis) indicated higher variability in Central American accessions compared to Asian, African and South American accessions. Polymorphism Information Content (PIC) values ranged from 0 to 0.65. In the set of Central American accessions. PIC values were higher than in other regions. Accessions from the Central American population contain alleles that were not found in the accessions from other populations. Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA; P¿
Original languageEnglish
Article number77
JournalBMC Plant Biology
Volume14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Keywords

  • net assimilation rate
  • relative growth-rate
  • genetic diversity
  • leaf-area
  • germplasm collection
  • biofuel plant
  • l. accessions
  • markers
  • aflp
  • variability

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