Herbivory and habitat association of tree seedlings in lowland evergreen rainforest on white-sand and terra-firme in the upper Rio Negro

J. Stropp, J.P. van der Sleen, C.A. Quesada, H. ter Steege

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: It has been proposed that the interaction between herbivory and soil nutrient availability drives habitat association of tree species in Peruvian Amazonia. Nevertheless, there is no empirical evidence that this interaction holds across other Amazonian regions. Aims: We address this knowledge gap by testing whether the interaction between herbivory and soil nutrient contributes to habitat association of tree species in white-sand and terra-firme forests in the upper Rio Negro, Brazil. Methods: We conducted a reciprocal transplanting field experiment in which we controlled for the presence of herbivores. We tested for differences in tree-seedling growth and herbivory among seven white-sand and seven terra-firme habitat-specialist species. Additionally, we assessed whether tree seedlings differed in their functional traits. Results: We found no empirical evidence that an interaction between herbivory and soil nutrients shapes habitat association in white-sand and terra-firme forests of the upper Rio Negro. Tree seedlings showed higher mortality when growing in their non-typical habitat. Growth and herbivory were similar regardless of the presence or absence of herbivore protection and type of soil. Conclusions: We suggest that the overall differences in soil nutrient status between white-sand and terra-firme forests in the upper Rio Negro are insufficient to trigger an interaction between herbivory and soil nutrient availability.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)255-265
JournalPlant Ecology & Diversity
Volume7
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

herbivory
rainforest
rain forests
lowlands
soil nutrient
herbivores
seedling
sand
soil nutrients
seedlings
habitat
habitats
nutrient availability
herbivore
Amazonia
transplanting (plants)
seedling growth
mortality
soil types
Brazil

Keywords

  • amazonian forests
  • resource availability
  • growth
  • patterns
  • soils
  • specialization
  • communities
  • landscape
  • diversity
  • worldwide

Cite this

@article{b408abc436ca45b79ba1e6bc37970510,
title = "Herbivory and habitat association of tree seedlings in lowland evergreen rainforest on white-sand and terra-firme in the upper Rio Negro",
abstract = "Background: It has been proposed that the interaction between herbivory and soil nutrient availability drives habitat association of tree species in Peruvian Amazonia. Nevertheless, there is no empirical evidence that this interaction holds across other Amazonian regions. Aims: We address this knowledge gap by testing whether the interaction between herbivory and soil nutrient contributes to habitat association of tree species in white-sand and terra-firme forests in the upper Rio Negro, Brazil. Methods: We conducted a reciprocal transplanting field experiment in which we controlled for the presence of herbivores. We tested for differences in tree-seedling growth and herbivory among seven white-sand and seven terra-firme habitat-specialist species. Additionally, we assessed whether tree seedlings differed in their functional traits. Results: We found no empirical evidence that an interaction between herbivory and soil nutrients shapes habitat association in white-sand and terra-firme forests of the upper Rio Negro. Tree seedlings showed higher mortality when growing in their non-typical habitat. Growth and herbivory were similar regardless of the presence or absence of herbivore protection and type of soil. Conclusions: We suggest that the overall differences in soil nutrient status between white-sand and terra-firme forests in the upper Rio Negro are insufficient to trigger an interaction between herbivory and soil nutrient availability.",
keywords = "amazonian forests, resource availability, growth, patterns, soils, specialization, communities, landscape, diversity, worldwide",
author = "J. Stropp and {van der Sleen}, J.P. and C.A. Quesada and {ter Steege}, H.",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1080/17550874.2013.773103",
language = "English",
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Herbivory and habitat association of tree seedlings in lowland evergreen rainforest on white-sand and terra-firme in the upper Rio Negro. / Stropp, J.; van der Sleen, J.P.; Quesada, C.A.; ter Steege, H.

In: Plant Ecology & Diversity, Vol. 7, No. 1-2, 2014, p. 255-265.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Herbivory and habitat association of tree seedlings in lowland evergreen rainforest on white-sand and terra-firme in the upper Rio Negro

AU - Stropp, J.

AU - van der Sleen, J.P.

AU - Quesada, C.A.

AU - ter Steege, H.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Background: It has been proposed that the interaction between herbivory and soil nutrient availability drives habitat association of tree species in Peruvian Amazonia. Nevertheless, there is no empirical evidence that this interaction holds across other Amazonian regions. Aims: We address this knowledge gap by testing whether the interaction between herbivory and soil nutrient contributes to habitat association of tree species in white-sand and terra-firme forests in the upper Rio Negro, Brazil. Methods: We conducted a reciprocal transplanting field experiment in which we controlled for the presence of herbivores. We tested for differences in tree-seedling growth and herbivory among seven white-sand and seven terra-firme habitat-specialist species. Additionally, we assessed whether tree seedlings differed in their functional traits. Results: We found no empirical evidence that an interaction between herbivory and soil nutrients shapes habitat association in white-sand and terra-firme forests of the upper Rio Negro. Tree seedlings showed higher mortality when growing in their non-typical habitat. Growth and herbivory were similar regardless of the presence or absence of herbivore protection and type of soil. Conclusions: We suggest that the overall differences in soil nutrient status between white-sand and terra-firme forests in the upper Rio Negro are insufficient to trigger an interaction between herbivory and soil nutrient availability.

AB - Background: It has been proposed that the interaction between herbivory and soil nutrient availability drives habitat association of tree species in Peruvian Amazonia. Nevertheless, there is no empirical evidence that this interaction holds across other Amazonian regions. Aims: We address this knowledge gap by testing whether the interaction between herbivory and soil nutrient contributes to habitat association of tree species in white-sand and terra-firme forests in the upper Rio Negro, Brazil. Methods: We conducted a reciprocal transplanting field experiment in which we controlled for the presence of herbivores. We tested for differences in tree-seedling growth and herbivory among seven white-sand and seven terra-firme habitat-specialist species. Additionally, we assessed whether tree seedlings differed in their functional traits. Results: We found no empirical evidence that an interaction between herbivory and soil nutrients shapes habitat association in white-sand and terra-firme forests of the upper Rio Negro. Tree seedlings showed higher mortality when growing in their non-typical habitat. Growth and herbivory were similar regardless of the presence or absence of herbivore protection and type of soil. Conclusions: We suggest that the overall differences in soil nutrient status between white-sand and terra-firme forests in the upper Rio Negro are insufficient to trigger an interaction between herbivory and soil nutrient availability.

KW - amazonian forests

KW - resource availability

KW - growth

KW - patterns

KW - soils

KW - specialization

KW - communities

KW - landscape

KW - diversity

KW - worldwide

U2 - 10.1080/17550874.2013.773103

DO - 10.1080/17550874.2013.773103

M3 - Article

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EP - 265

JO - Plant Ecology & Diversity

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SN - 1755-0874

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ER -