Health monitoring of plants by their emitted volatiles: A model to predict the effect of Botrytis cinerea on the concentration of volatiles in a large-scale greenhouse

R.M.C. Jansen, J.W. Hofstee, J. Wildt, B.H.E. Vanthoor, F.W.A. Verstappen, K. Takayama, H.J. Bouwmeester, E.J. van Henten

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9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper describes a model to calculate the concentrations of (Z)-3-hexenol, a-pinene, a-terpinene, ß-caryophyllene, and methyl salicylate in a greenhouse on the basis of their source and sink behaviour. The model was used to determine whether these volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can be used to indicate Botrytis cinerea infection in a large-scale tomato production greenhouse with a volume of 5 × 104 m3 containing 2.2 × 104 plants. Seven experiments were done to parameterise the model for these VOCs. Based on model predictions, the B. cinerea-induced increase in concentration of methyl salicylate is detectable in a large-scale tomato production greenhouse when: (a) windows are fully opened, and (b) the increase continues for at least 1 h, and (c) 5% of the plants are infected. The B. cinerea-induced increase in concentration of methyl salicylate is also detectable when: (a) windows are closed, and (b) the increase continues for at least 6 h, and (c) 5% of the plants are infected. The B. cinerea-induced increase in concentration of (Z)-3-hexenol is detectable under all conditions studied. However, it is expected that besides infected plants, many additional sources of (Z)-3-hexenol exist including plant debris and nearby field crops especially upon harvest or stress. The B. cinerea-induced increases in concentration of a-pinene, a-terpinene and ß-caryophyllene are probably undetectable in a large-scale tomato production greenhouse. Therefore, it is recommended to focus on the detection of methyl salicylate to indicate B. cinerea infections in large-scale tomato production greenhouses.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)37-47
JournalBiosystems Engineering
Volume106
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Keywords

  • semivolatile organic-compounds
  • partition-coefficients
  • voc emissions
  • monoterpenes
  • temperature
  • dependence
  • indicator
  • sorption
  • stress
  • system

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