Harvest-induced maturation evolution under different life-history trade-offs and harvesting regimes

J.J. Poos, A. Brannstrom, U. Dieckman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The potential of harvesting to induce adaptive changes in exploited populations is now increasingly recognized. While early studies predicted that elevated mortalities among larger individuals select for reduced maturation size, recent theoretical studies have shown conditions under which other, more complex evolutionary responses to size-selective mortality are expected. These new predictions are based on the assumption that, owing to the trade-off between growth and reproduction, early maturation implies reduced growth. Here we extend these findings by analyzing a model of a harvested size-structured population in continuous time, and by systematically exploring maturation evolution under all three traditionally acknowledged costs of early maturation: reduced fecundity, reduced growth, and/or increased natural mortality. We further extend this analysis to the two main types of harvest selectivity, with an individual's chance of getting harvested depending on its size and/or maturity stage. Surprisingly, we find that harvesting mature individuals not only favors late maturation when the costs of early maturation are low, but promotes early maturation when the costs of early maturation are high. To our knowledge, this study therefore is the first to show that harvesting mature individuals can induce early maturation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)102-112
JournalJournal of Theoretical Biology
Volume279
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Harvesting
early development
Trade-offs
life history
Mortality
Costs and Cost Analysis
Growth
Costs
Population Density
Structured Populations
Reproduction
Fertility
Theoretical Models
Selectivity
Continuous Time
maturity stage
Imply
Population
Life
History

Keywords

  • north-sea plaice
  • fisheries-induced evolution
  • herring clupea-harengus
  • evolving fish stocks
  • cod gadus-morhua
  • reaction norms
  • population-dynamics
  • marine reserves
  • brook charr
  • arctic cod

Cite this

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title = "Harvest-induced maturation evolution under different life-history trade-offs and harvesting regimes",
abstract = "The potential of harvesting to induce adaptive changes in exploited populations is now increasingly recognized. While early studies predicted that elevated mortalities among larger individuals select for reduced maturation size, recent theoretical studies have shown conditions under which other, more complex evolutionary responses to size-selective mortality are expected. These new predictions are based on the assumption that, owing to the trade-off between growth and reproduction, early maturation implies reduced growth. Here we extend these findings by analyzing a model of a harvested size-structured population in continuous time, and by systematically exploring maturation evolution under all three traditionally acknowledged costs of early maturation: reduced fecundity, reduced growth, and/or increased natural mortality. We further extend this analysis to the two main types of harvest selectivity, with an individual's chance of getting harvested depending on its size and/or maturity stage. Surprisingly, we find that harvesting mature individuals not only favors late maturation when the costs of early maturation are low, but promotes early maturation when the costs of early maturation are high. To our knowledge, this study therefore is the first to show that harvesting mature individuals can induce early maturation.",
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Harvest-induced maturation evolution under different life-history trade-offs and harvesting regimes. / Poos, J.J.; Brannstrom, A.; Dieckman, U.

In: Journal of Theoretical Biology, Vol. 279, No. 1, 2011, p. 102-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Harvest-induced maturation evolution under different life-history trade-offs and harvesting regimes

AU - Poos, J.J.

AU - Brannstrom, A.

AU - Dieckman, U.

PY - 2011

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AB - The potential of harvesting to induce adaptive changes in exploited populations is now increasingly recognized. While early studies predicted that elevated mortalities among larger individuals select for reduced maturation size, recent theoretical studies have shown conditions under which other, more complex evolutionary responses to size-selective mortality are expected. These new predictions are based on the assumption that, owing to the trade-off between growth and reproduction, early maturation implies reduced growth. Here we extend these findings by analyzing a model of a harvested size-structured population in continuous time, and by systematically exploring maturation evolution under all three traditionally acknowledged costs of early maturation: reduced fecundity, reduced growth, and/or increased natural mortality. We further extend this analysis to the two main types of harvest selectivity, with an individual's chance of getting harvested depending on its size and/or maturity stage. Surprisingly, we find that harvesting mature individuals not only favors late maturation when the costs of early maturation are low, but promotes early maturation when the costs of early maturation are high. To our knowledge, this study therefore is the first to show that harvesting mature individuals can induce early maturation.

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KW - fisheries-induced evolution

KW - herring clupea-harengus

KW - evolving fish stocks

KW - cod gadus-morhua

KW - reaction norms

KW - population-dynamics

KW - marine reserves

KW - brook charr

KW - arctic cod

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