Handgrip strength does not represent an appropriate measure to evaluate changes in muscle strength during an exercise intervention program in frail elderly people

C.A.B. Tieland, L. Verdijk, C.P.G.M. de Groot, L.J.C. van Loon

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33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although handgrip strength is considered a strong predictor of negative health outcomes, it is unclear whether handgrip strength represents a useful measure to evaluate changes in muscle strength following resistance-type exercise training in elderly people. We assessed whether measuring handgrip strength provides proper insight in the efficacy of resistance-type exercise training to increase muscle mass, strength and physical performance in frail elderly. Methods: Pre-frail and frail elderly (=65 y) were either conducting a 24 wk resistance-type exercise training or no exercise training. Before, during, and after the intervention, handgrip strength (JAMAR), lean body mass (DXA), leg strength (1-RM), and physical performance (SPPB) were assessed. Results: Handgrip strength correlated with appendicular lean mass (¿ =0.68; P
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)27-36
JournalInternational Journal of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism
Volume25
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Keywords

  • randomized controlled-trial
  • placebo-controlled trial
  • healthy elderly-women
  • bone-mineral density
  • protein supplementation
  • physical performance
  • training-program
  • body-composition
  • resistance exercise
  • muscular strength

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