Habitual diet and diet quality in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A case-control study

Ettje F. Tigchelaar, Zlatan Mujagic, Alexandra Zhernakova, M. Hesselink, S. Meijboom, C.W.M. Perenboom, A.A.M. Masclee, Cisca Wijmenga, E.J.M. Feskens, D. Jonkers*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Diet is considered to be a key factor in symptom generation in Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and patients tend to exclude food products from their diet in pursue of symptom relief, which may impair diet quality. Methods We evaluated habitual dietary intake in IBS patients with regard to nutrients and food products using an extensive food frequency questionnaire. One hundred ninety-four IBS patients were compared to 186 healthy controls using multiple logistic regression analysis. An overall diet quality score was calculated for each participant based on the criteria of the Dutch Healthy Diet (DHD) index. Key Results A lower DHD-score was found for IBS (mean [SD]: 52.9 [9.6]) vs controls (55.1 [9.2], P=.02). The diet of patients was lower in fibers (21 g vs 25 g per day, P=.002) and fructose (14 g vs 16 g, P=.033), while higher in total fat (37% vs 36% of total energy intake, P=.010) and added sugars (46 g vs 44 g, P=.029). Differences in daily intake of food products included lower consumption of apples (40 g vs 69 g, P<.001), pasta (28 vs 37 g, P=.029) and alcoholic beverages (130 g vs 193 g, P=.024) and higher consumption of processed meat (38 g vs 29 g, P<.001). Some of these findings correlated with gastrointestinal symptoms, showing differences between IBS subtypes. Conclusions and Inferences Differences in habitual diet were described, showing lower diet quality in IBS patients compared to controls, with increased consumption of fat and lower intake of fibers and fructose. Our data support the importance of personalized and professional nutritional guidance of IBS patients.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere13151
JournalNeurogastroenterology & Motility
Volume29
Issue number12
Early online date17 Jul 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2017

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