Genetical genomic approaches for understanding climatic adaptation in natural populations of Caenorhabditis elegans

O. Alda Alvarez, J.C.P. Prins, J. Fu, R.C. Jansen, J.E. Kammenga

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingAbstract

Abstract

Genetical genomic approaches for understanding climatic adaptation in natural populations of Caenorhabditis elegans. O. Alda A` lvarez1, P. Prins1, J. Fu2, R. Jansen2 and J. Kammenga1 1Laboratory of Nematology, Wageningen University, Binnenhaven 5, 6709 PD Wageningen, Netherlands; 2Groningen Bioinformatics Center, University of Groningen, Kerklaan 30, 9751 NN, Haren, Netherlands; Since Bergmann¿s observation in 1847 that mammals tend to grow bigger with increasing distance from the equator (Bergmann¿s rule) biologists have been fascinated by the geographical distribution of body size. It was discovered that not only mammals but also ectotherms, such as fish, bacteria, protists, invetrebrates and plants, grow larger in regions further away from zero latitude. This latitudinal size gradient correlates strongly with a thermal size gradient in which body size increases in colder environments. Although many explanations have been offered considering the underlying mechanism of Bergmann¿s rule, the molecular genetic control is unknown. A C. elegans strain (N2) from temperate regions (UK, min¿max temperature 4¿18 ) complied with Bergmann¿s rule and grew bigger at lower temperatures, whereas a strain (CB4856) from tropical regions (Hawaii, min¿max temperature 23¿24 ) did not. After crossing these strains and inbreeding for 20 generations we obtained a segregant population of SNP genotyped RILs. So far we have mapped several QTLs underlying body size changes at the respective temperatures of 12 and 24 . Presently we are exposing all RILs to the same temperatures, extracting RNA and hybridizing all RIL samples according to Fu and Jansen (in prep) using whole genome oligo arrays (obtained from GSC, Washinton University, St. Louis). The quality of the arrays is checked according to Prins et al. (in prep) and QTL analysis will be run on the expression profiles of the RILs. Using this genetical genomics approach we hope to unravel the linked genes which control Bergmann¿s rule in C. elegans
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProgram & Abstract Book of the 8th International Meeting of the Microarry Gene Expression Data Society
Place of PublicationBergen Norway
Pages19 P100
Publication statusPublished - 2005
Event8th International Meeting of the Microarry Gene Expression Data Society -
Duration: 11 Sep 200513 Sep 2005

Conference

Conference8th International Meeting of the Microarry Gene Expression Data Society
Period11/09/0513/09/05

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Genetical genomic approaches for understanding climatic adaptation in natural populations of Caenorhabditis elegans'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this