Genetic variability in duration of pre-heading phases and relationships with leaf appearance and tillering dynamics in a barley population.

G. Borràs, I. Romagosa, F.A. van Eeuwijk, G.A. Slafer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The stem elongation phase seems critical in yield potential determination in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Extending its duration, without modifying total time to anthesis, has been proposed as a promising breeding tool. A prerequisite for its use is that the duration of phases before and after jointing (that including leaf and spikelet initiation, LS, and that of stem elongation, SE) should be under different genetic control. In addition, little is known about the implications of changes in the duration of LS and SE upon other developmental traits which could affect other aspects of yield generation, such as phyllochron and tillering. Thus, the objectives of the present work were to study the genetic variability in LS and SE, in traits related to leaf appearance and tillering, as well as their relationships, in a double-haploid (DH) population derived from the cross Henni × Meltan. DH lines and both parents were studied in four field trials. Despite the similarity in development between parents, there was significant genetic variability in duration of both LS and SE (i.e. considerable transgressive segregation was observed), with no major genetic correlations found between them. Although some significant genetic correlations were found between duration of phases and leaf appearance and tillering traits, it has been shown that modifying the duration of LS does not necessarily imply concomitant changes in traits that could be important for an early expansion of the crop canopy (i.e. phyllochron, onset and rate of tillering).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-104
JournalField Crops Research
Volume113
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Keywords

  • hordeum-vulgare l
  • harsh mediterranean environments
  • controlling flowering time
  • increasing early vigor
  • stem elongation
  • spring barley
  • photoperiod sensitivity
  • apical development
  • agronomic traits
  • fertile florets

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