Genetic structure in populations of an ancient woodland sedge, carex sylvatica Hudson, at a regional and local scale.

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Abstract

Wood sedge (Carex sylvatica) is a well-known ancient woodland species with a long-term persistent seed bank and a caespitose growth habit. All thirteen isolated Carex sylvatica populations in the Dutch Rhine floodplain (including the river branches Waal and IJssel) were mapped in detail and analysed for genetic variation at a large number of AFLP loci and one microsatellite locus. Across all populations, only 40 % of the sampled individuals (n = 216) represented a unique genotype. A high number of the studied patches (spatial clusters of tussocks, 2 - 10 m in diameter) within populations contained only one or a few genotypes. Identical plants (tussocks) were also found 20 - 500 m apart and in one case even 1000 m apart. Observed heterozygosity levels (HO= 0.029) were low, indicating low levels of gene flow, which is in agreement with the selfing nature of other caespitose sedges. Although the number of genotypes in populations is low, these genotypes are genetically very distinct and variation within populations accounted for 55 % of the total variation. The absence of a correlation between genetic and geographic distances among populations, and the scattered distribution of genotypes among patches within woodlands, support our hypothesis of rare establishments and subsequent local dispersal within woodlands in this forest floor species, which may benefit from and partly depend on human land use and forest management activities.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)387-396
JournalPlant Biology
Volume7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

sedge
Carex
genetic structure
woodlands
woodland
population structure
genotype
autogamy
seed bank
loci
forest floor
land use planning
heterozygosity
growth habit
gene flow
forest management
Cyperaceae
genetic variation
floodplain
buried seeds

Keywords

  • aflp markers
  • cyperaceae
  • dna
  • differentiation
  • diversity
  • europe
  • plants
  • l.

Cite this

@article{6c219040ba484eedb659f0b2b96c9681,
title = "Genetic structure in populations of an ancient woodland sedge, carex sylvatica Hudson, at a regional and local scale.",
abstract = "Wood sedge (Carex sylvatica) is a well-known ancient woodland species with a long-term persistent seed bank and a caespitose growth habit. All thirteen isolated Carex sylvatica populations in the Dutch Rhine floodplain (including the river branches Waal and IJssel) were mapped in detail and analysed for genetic variation at a large number of AFLP loci and one microsatellite locus. Across all populations, only 40 {\%} of the sampled individuals (n = 216) represented a unique genotype. A high number of the studied patches (spatial clusters of tussocks, 2 - 10 m in diameter) within populations contained only one or a few genotypes. Identical plants (tussocks) were also found 20 - 500 m apart and in one case even 1000 m apart. Observed heterozygosity levels (HO= 0.029) were low, indicating low levels of gene flow, which is in agreement with the selfing nature of other caespitose sedges. Although the number of genotypes in populations is low, these genotypes are genetically very distinct and variation within populations accounted for 55 {\%} of the total variation. The absence of a correlation between genetic and geographic distances among populations, and the scattered distribution of genotypes among patches within woodlands, support our hypothesis of rare establishments and subsequent local dispersal within woodlands in this forest floor species, which may benefit from and partly depend on human land use and forest management activities.",
keywords = "aflp markers, cyperaceae, dna, differentiation, diversity, europe, plants, l.",
author = "P.F.P. Arens and R.J. Bijlsma and {van 't Westende}, W.P.C. and {van Os}, B. and M.J.M. Smulders and B.J. Vosman",
year = "2005",
doi = "10.1055/s-2005-865644",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "387--396",
journal = "Plant Biology",
issn = "1435-8603",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Genetic structure in populations of an ancient woodland sedge, carex sylvatica Hudson, at a regional and local scale.

AU - Arens, P.F.P.

AU - Bijlsma, R.J.

AU - van 't Westende, W.P.C.

AU - van Os, B.

AU - Smulders, M.J.M.

AU - Vosman, B.J.

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - Wood sedge (Carex sylvatica) is a well-known ancient woodland species with a long-term persistent seed bank and a caespitose growth habit. All thirteen isolated Carex sylvatica populations in the Dutch Rhine floodplain (including the river branches Waal and IJssel) were mapped in detail and analysed for genetic variation at a large number of AFLP loci and one microsatellite locus. Across all populations, only 40 % of the sampled individuals (n = 216) represented a unique genotype. A high number of the studied patches (spatial clusters of tussocks, 2 - 10 m in diameter) within populations contained only one or a few genotypes. Identical plants (tussocks) were also found 20 - 500 m apart and in one case even 1000 m apart. Observed heterozygosity levels (HO= 0.029) were low, indicating low levels of gene flow, which is in agreement with the selfing nature of other caespitose sedges. Although the number of genotypes in populations is low, these genotypes are genetically very distinct and variation within populations accounted for 55 % of the total variation. The absence of a correlation between genetic and geographic distances among populations, and the scattered distribution of genotypes among patches within woodlands, support our hypothesis of rare establishments and subsequent local dispersal within woodlands in this forest floor species, which may benefit from and partly depend on human land use and forest management activities.

AB - Wood sedge (Carex sylvatica) is a well-known ancient woodland species with a long-term persistent seed bank and a caespitose growth habit. All thirteen isolated Carex sylvatica populations in the Dutch Rhine floodplain (including the river branches Waal and IJssel) were mapped in detail and analysed for genetic variation at a large number of AFLP loci and one microsatellite locus. Across all populations, only 40 % of the sampled individuals (n = 216) represented a unique genotype. A high number of the studied patches (spatial clusters of tussocks, 2 - 10 m in diameter) within populations contained only one or a few genotypes. Identical plants (tussocks) were also found 20 - 500 m apart and in one case even 1000 m apart. Observed heterozygosity levels (HO= 0.029) were low, indicating low levels of gene flow, which is in agreement with the selfing nature of other caespitose sedges. Although the number of genotypes in populations is low, these genotypes are genetically very distinct and variation within populations accounted for 55 % of the total variation. The absence of a correlation between genetic and geographic distances among populations, and the scattered distribution of genotypes among patches within woodlands, support our hypothesis of rare establishments and subsequent local dispersal within woodlands in this forest floor species, which may benefit from and partly depend on human land use and forest management activities.

KW - aflp markers

KW - cyperaceae

KW - dna

KW - differentiation

KW - diversity

KW - europe

KW - plants

KW - l.

U2 - 10.1055/s-2005-865644

DO - 10.1055/s-2005-865644

M3 - Article

VL - 7

SP - 387

EP - 396

JO - Plant Biology

JF - Plant Biology

SN - 1435-8603

ER -