Genetic diversity of different indigenous chicken ecotypes using highly polymorphic MHC-linked and non-MHC microsatellite markers

K. Ngeno, E.H. van der Waaij, H.J.W.C. Megens, A.K. Kahi, J.A.M. van Arendonk, R.P.M.A. Crooijmans

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingAbstract

Abstract

The study investigated the genetic make-up of different ecotypes of indigenous chickens (ICs) in Kenya based on major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-linked and non-MHC microsatellite markers. Blood samples were collected from eight regions (48 birds per region) of Kenya: Kakamega (KK), Siaya (BN), West Pokot (WP), Turkana (TK), Bomet (BM), Narok (NR), Lamu (LM) and Taita-Taveta (TT) and genotyped using two MHC-linked and ten non-MHC markers. All MHC-linked and non-MHC markers were polymorphic with a total of 140 alleles, of which 56 were identified in MHC-linked markers. Mean number of alleles (Na and Ne), private alleles, heterozygosity and genetic distances were higher for MHC-linked markers compared with non-MHC markers. The ad hoc statistic ¿K detected the true numbers of clusters to be three for MHC-linked markers and two in non-MHC markers. In conclusion, Kenyan ICs belong into two to three genetically distinct groups. Different markers systems have different clustering system. MHC-linked markers divided ICs into three mixed clusters, composing of individuals from the different ecotypes whereas non-MHC markers grouped ICs into two groups. These IC ecotypes host many and highly diverse MHC-linked alleles. Higher allelic diversity indicated a huge amount of genetic variation in the MHC region of ICs and supported their reputation of being hardy and resistant to diseases.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationImproving Indigenous Chicken Productivity for Health and Wealth
Pages33-33
Publication statusPublished - 2015
EventRegional Conference on Sustainable Improvement of Indigenous Chicken Productivity, Egerton University, Kenya -
Duration: 9 Sep 201510 Sep 2015

Conference

ConferenceRegional Conference on Sustainable Improvement of Indigenous Chicken Productivity, Egerton University, Kenya
Period9/09/1510/09/15

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