Gene interactions observed with the HDL-c blood lipid, intakes of protein, sugar and biotin in relation to circulating homocysteine concentrations in a group of black South Africans

Jacomina P. du Plessis, Alida Melse-Boonstra, Lizelle Zandberg, Cornelie Nienaber-Rousseau*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Elevated homocysteine (Hcy) is associated with several pathologies. Gene–diet interactions related to Hcy might be used to customize dietary advice to reduce disease incidence. To explore this possibility, we investigated interactions between anthropometry, biochemical markers and diet and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in relation to Hcy concentrations. Five SNPs of Hcy-metabolizing enzymes were analyzed in 2010 black South Africans. Results: Hcy was higher with each additional methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T minor allele copy, but was lower in methionine synthase (MTR) 2756AA homozygotes than heterozygotes. Individuals harboring cystathionine β synthase (CBS) 833 T/844ins68 had lower Hcy concentrations than others. No interactive effects were observed with any of the anthropometrical markers. MTHFR C677T and CBS T833C/844ins68 homozygote minor allele carriers presented with lower Hcy as high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) increased. Hcy concentrations were negatively associated with dietary protein and animal protein intake in the TT and TC genotypes, but positively in the CC genotype of CBS T833C/844ins68. Hcy was markedly higher in TT homozygotes of MTHFR C677T as added sugar intake increased. In CBS T833C/844ins68 major allele carriers, biotin intake was negatively associated with Hcy; but positively in those harboring the homozygous minor allele. Conclusions: The Hcy–SNP associations are modulated by diet and open up the possibility of invoking dietary interventions to treat hyperhomocysteinemia. Future intervention trials should further explore the observed gene–diet and gene–blood lipid interactions.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100556
JournalMolecular Genetics and Metabolism Reports
Volume22
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2020

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Homocysteine
Biotin
HDL Cholesterol
Lipids
Genes
Proteins
Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (NADPH2)
Homozygote
Alleles
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Genotype
Cystathionine
5-Methyltetrahydrofolate-Homocysteine S-Methyltransferase
Diet
Hyperhomocysteinemia
Anthropometry
Dietary Proteins
Heterozygote
Biomarkers
Pathology

Keywords

  • Biotin
  • Blood lipid–gene interactions
  • Gene–diet interactions
  • Hyperhomocysteinemia
  • Nutrient–gene interactions
  • Nutrigenetics
  • Precision nutrition
  • Protein
  • Sugar
  • Total homocysteine

Cite this

@article{6e26fd78d49545e4a01e684320c86c78,
title = "Gene interactions observed with the HDL-c blood lipid, intakes of protein, sugar and biotin in relation to circulating homocysteine concentrations in a group of black South Africans",
abstract = "Background: Elevated homocysteine (Hcy) is associated with several pathologies. Gene–diet interactions related to Hcy might be used to customize dietary advice to reduce disease incidence. To explore this possibility, we investigated interactions between anthropometry, biochemical markers and diet and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in relation to Hcy concentrations. Five SNPs of Hcy-metabolizing enzymes were analyzed in 2010 black South Africans. Results: Hcy was higher with each additional methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T minor allele copy, but was lower in methionine synthase (MTR) 2756AA homozygotes than heterozygotes. Individuals harboring cystathionine β synthase (CBS) 833 T/844ins68 had lower Hcy concentrations than others. No interactive effects were observed with any of the anthropometrical markers. MTHFR C677T and CBS T833C/844ins68 homozygote minor allele carriers presented with lower Hcy as high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) increased. Hcy concentrations were negatively associated with dietary protein and animal protein intake in the TT and TC genotypes, but positively in the CC genotype of CBS T833C/844ins68. Hcy was markedly higher in TT homozygotes of MTHFR C677T as added sugar intake increased. In CBS T833C/844ins68 major allele carriers, biotin intake was negatively associated with Hcy; but positively in those harboring the homozygous minor allele. Conclusions: The Hcy–SNP associations are modulated by diet and open up the possibility of invoking dietary interventions to treat hyperhomocysteinemia. Future intervention trials should further explore the observed gene–diet and gene–blood lipid interactions.",
keywords = "Biotin, Blood lipid–gene interactions, Gene–diet interactions, Hyperhomocysteinemia, Nutrient–gene interactions, Nutrigenetics, Precision nutrition, Protein, Sugar, Total homocysteine",
author = "{du Plessis}, {Jacomina P.} and Alida Melse-Boonstra and Lizelle Zandberg and Cornelie Nienaber-Rousseau",
year = "2020",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ymgmr.2019.100556",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
journal = "Molecular Genetics and Metabolism Reports",
issn = "2214-4269",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

Gene interactions observed with the HDL-c blood lipid, intakes of protein, sugar and biotin in relation to circulating homocysteine concentrations in a group of black South Africans. / du Plessis, Jacomina P.; Melse-Boonstra, Alida; Zandberg, Lizelle; Nienaber-Rousseau, Cornelie.

In: Molecular Genetics and Metabolism Reports, Vol. 22, 100556, 01.03.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gene interactions observed with the HDL-c blood lipid, intakes of protein, sugar and biotin in relation to circulating homocysteine concentrations in a group of black South Africans

AU - du Plessis, Jacomina P.

AU - Melse-Boonstra, Alida

AU - Zandberg, Lizelle

AU - Nienaber-Rousseau, Cornelie

PY - 2020/3/1

Y1 - 2020/3/1

N2 - Background: Elevated homocysteine (Hcy) is associated with several pathologies. Gene–diet interactions related to Hcy might be used to customize dietary advice to reduce disease incidence. To explore this possibility, we investigated interactions between anthropometry, biochemical markers and diet and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in relation to Hcy concentrations. Five SNPs of Hcy-metabolizing enzymes were analyzed in 2010 black South Africans. Results: Hcy was higher with each additional methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T minor allele copy, but was lower in methionine synthase (MTR) 2756AA homozygotes than heterozygotes. Individuals harboring cystathionine β synthase (CBS) 833 T/844ins68 had lower Hcy concentrations than others. No interactive effects were observed with any of the anthropometrical markers. MTHFR C677T and CBS T833C/844ins68 homozygote minor allele carriers presented with lower Hcy as high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) increased. Hcy concentrations were negatively associated with dietary protein and animal protein intake in the TT and TC genotypes, but positively in the CC genotype of CBS T833C/844ins68. Hcy was markedly higher in TT homozygotes of MTHFR C677T as added sugar intake increased. In CBS T833C/844ins68 major allele carriers, biotin intake was negatively associated with Hcy; but positively in those harboring the homozygous minor allele. Conclusions: The Hcy–SNP associations are modulated by diet and open up the possibility of invoking dietary interventions to treat hyperhomocysteinemia. Future intervention trials should further explore the observed gene–diet and gene–blood lipid interactions.

AB - Background: Elevated homocysteine (Hcy) is associated with several pathologies. Gene–diet interactions related to Hcy might be used to customize dietary advice to reduce disease incidence. To explore this possibility, we investigated interactions between anthropometry, biochemical markers and diet and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in relation to Hcy concentrations. Five SNPs of Hcy-metabolizing enzymes were analyzed in 2010 black South Africans. Results: Hcy was higher with each additional methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T minor allele copy, but was lower in methionine synthase (MTR) 2756AA homozygotes than heterozygotes. Individuals harboring cystathionine β synthase (CBS) 833 T/844ins68 had lower Hcy concentrations than others. No interactive effects were observed with any of the anthropometrical markers. MTHFR C677T and CBS T833C/844ins68 homozygote minor allele carriers presented with lower Hcy as high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) increased. Hcy concentrations were negatively associated with dietary protein and animal protein intake in the TT and TC genotypes, but positively in the CC genotype of CBS T833C/844ins68. Hcy was markedly higher in TT homozygotes of MTHFR C677T as added sugar intake increased. In CBS T833C/844ins68 major allele carriers, biotin intake was negatively associated with Hcy; but positively in those harboring the homozygous minor allele. Conclusions: The Hcy–SNP associations are modulated by diet and open up the possibility of invoking dietary interventions to treat hyperhomocysteinemia. Future intervention trials should further explore the observed gene–diet and gene–blood lipid interactions.

KW - Biotin

KW - Blood lipid–gene interactions

KW - Gene–diet interactions

KW - Hyperhomocysteinemia

KW - Nutrient–gene interactions

KW - Nutrigenetics

KW - Precision nutrition

KW - Protein

KW - Sugar

KW - Total homocysteine

U2 - 10.1016/j.ymgmr.2019.100556

DO - 10.1016/j.ymgmr.2019.100556

M3 - Article

VL - 22

JO - Molecular Genetics and Metabolism Reports

JF - Molecular Genetics and Metabolism Reports

SN - 2214-4269

M1 - 100556

ER -