Fruit consumption of boys (8-11 years) is related to preferences for sour taste

D.G. Liem, R.P. Bogers, P.C. Dagnelie, C. de Graaf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study investigated whether the most preferred balance between sweet and sour taste of children (n = 50, 9.2 +/- 0.9 yrs of age) are related to their consumption of fruit. Taste preferences were measured with a rank-by-elimination procedure with seven sweet orangeades that differed in added citric acid (i.e. 0.009-0.065 M). Fruit consumption was assessed with a questionnaire that was completed by the children's parents. Results showed that boys' but not girls' most preferred balance between sweet and sour taste was positively correlated with their consumption of fruit: that is, the more added citric acid was preferred the more fruit was consumed. We conclude that preference for high concentrations of citric acid in a sweet context may be associated with the consumption of fruit in boys. In girls, the optimal balance between sweet and sour taste seems to be of less importance; their consumption of fruit may be more influenced by their parents, availability and health related motives. (c) 2005 Published by Elsevier Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)93-96
JournalAppetite
Volume46
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Keywords

  • food preferences
  • vegetable intake
  • young-children
  • mothers
  • predictors
  • behavior
  • sweet

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