Frontiers of solution-oriented adaptation research

A. Bisaro, R.J. Swart, J. Hinkel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Adaptation is heterogeneous and relevant for a range of sectors and levels of decision-making. As adaptation moves up the policy agenda, solution-oriented adaptation research requires addressing questions that are salient to stakeholders and decision-makers at various scales and involves applying a wide range of different methods. Yet while solution-oriented adaptation research is being increasingly undertaken, there is to date a lack of synthesis of these experiences in the literature. In this paper, we aim to address this gap by synthesising findings in nine cases from the MEDIATION project (Methodology for Effective Decision-making on Impacts and AdaptaTION), an EC-funded solution-oriented adaptation research project. We do so by, first, describing methods applied for solution-oriented research in Europe and sequences of methods carried out in individual cases. Second, we assess strengths and weaknesses of individual methods in given empirical situations. Third, we analyse patterns observed in the sequences of methods and reflect on their implications for adaptation research. A strength of our approach is that detailed data on choices of research questions and methods were collected through in-depth and iterative interaction with the case study teams. We find that there is no standard recipe for adaptation; that even though social science methods are often indicated, they are often not applied; and that robust decision-making methods, while available, are often constrained because of their resource intensity. Reflecting on the implications of these findings, we argue that greater flexibility and transdisciplinarity are needed in adaptation research and that social science methods should be further supported. Finally, we find that stakeholder engagement is not a panacea and that engagement requires a more differentiated understanding of stakeholders and careful design in order to be effective.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)123-136
JournalRegional Environmental Change
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Bisaro, A. ; Swart, R.J. ; Hinkel, J. / Frontiers of solution-oriented adaptation research. In: Regional Environmental Change. 2016 ; Vol. 16, No. 1. pp. 123-136.
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Frontiers of solution-oriented adaptation research. / Bisaro, A.; Swart, R.J.; Hinkel, J.

In: Regional Environmental Change, Vol. 16, No. 1, 2016, p. 123-136.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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