From the Sugar Platform to biofuels and biochemicals : Final report for the European Commission Directorate-General Energy

R. Taylor, L. Nattrass, G. Alberts, P. Robson, C. Chudziak, A. Bauen, I.M. Libelli, G. Lotti, M. Prussi, R. Nistri, D. Chiaramonti, A.M. lópez-Contreras, H.L. Bos, G. Eggink, J. Springer, R. Bakker, R. van Ree

Research output: Book/ReportReportProfessional

Abstract

Numerous potential pathways to biofuels and biochemicals exist via the sugar platform1. This study uses literature surveys, market data and stakeholder input to provide a comprehensive evidence base for policymakers and industry – identifying the key benefits and development needs for the sugar platform. The study created a company database for 94 sugar-based products, with some already commercial, the majority at research/pilot stage, and only a few demonstration plants crossing the “valley of death”. Case studies describe the value proposition, market outlook and EU activity for ten value chains (acrylic, adipic & succinic acids, FDCA, BDO, farnesene, isobutene, PLA, PHAs and PE). Most can deliver significant greenhouse savings and drop-in (or improved) properties, but at an added cost to fossil alternatives. Whilst significant progress has been made, research barriers remain around lignocellulosic biomass fractionation, product separation energy, biological inhibition, chemical selectivity and monomer purity, plus improving whole chain process integration. An assessment of EU competitiveness highlights strengths in R&D, but a lack of strong commercial activity, due to the US, China and Brazil having more attractive feedstock and investment conditions. Further policy development, in particular for biochemicals, will be required to realise a competitive European sugar-based bioeconomy.
Original languageEnglish
PublisherE4tech/Re-CORD/Wageningen UR
Number of pages183
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

governance
biofuels
sugars
energy
Death Valley
farnesene
market value
development policy
succinic acid
supply chain
feedstocks
purity
stakeholders
fractionation
fossils
case studies
markets
industry
greenhouses
Brazil

Keywords

  • biobased chemistry
  • biobased chemicals
  • case studies
  • sugar
  • chemical industry
  • europe
  • surveys
  • biobased economy

Cite this

Taylor, R., Nattrass, L., Alberts, G., Robson, P., Chudziak, C., Bauen, A., ... van Ree, R. (2015). From the Sugar Platform to biofuels and biochemicals : Final report for the European Commission Directorate-General Energy. E4tech/Re-CORD/Wageningen UR.
Taylor, R. ; Nattrass, L. ; Alberts, G. ; Robson, P. ; Chudziak, C. ; Bauen, A. ; Libelli, I.M. ; Lotti, G. ; Prussi, M. ; Nistri, R. ; Chiaramonti, D. ; lópez-Contreras, A.M. ; Bos, H.L. ; Eggink, G. ; Springer, J. ; Bakker, R. ; van Ree, R. / From the Sugar Platform to biofuels and biochemicals : Final report for the European Commission Directorate-General Energy. E4tech/Re-CORD/Wageningen UR, 2015. 183 p.
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author = "R. Taylor and L. Nattrass and G. Alberts and P. Robson and C. Chudziak and A. Bauen and I.M. Libelli and G. Lotti and M. Prussi and R. Nistri and D. Chiaramonti and A.M. l{\'o}pez-Contreras and H.L. Bos and G. Eggink and J. Springer and R. Bakker and {van Ree}, R.",
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Taylor, R, Nattrass, L, Alberts, G, Robson, P, Chudziak, C, Bauen, A, Libelli, IM, Lotti, G, Prussi, M, Nistri, R, Chiaramonti, D, lópez-Contreras, AM, Bos, HL, Eggink, G, Springer, J, Bakker, R & van Ree, R 2015, From the Sugar Platform to biofuels and biochemicals : Final report for the European Commission Directorate-General Energy. E4tech/Re-CORD/Wageningen UR.

From the Sugar Platform to biofuels and biochemicals : Final report for the European Commission Directorate-General Energy. / Taylor, R.; Nattrass, L.; Alberts, G.; Robson, P.; Chudziak, C.; Bauen, A.; Libelli, I.M.; Lotti, G.; Prussi, M.; Nistri, R.; Chiaramonti, D.; lópez-Contreras, A.M.; Bos, H.L.; Eggink, G.; Springer, J.; Bakker, R.; van Ree, R.

E4tech/Re-CORD/Wageningen UR, 2015. 183 p.

Research output: Book/ReportReportProfessional

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T1 - From the Sugar Platform to biofuels and biochemicals : Final report for the European Commission Directorate-General Energy

AU - Taylor, R.

AU - Nattrass, L.

AU - Alberts, G.

AU - Robson, P.

AU - Chudziak, C.

AU - Bauen, A.

AU - Libelli, I.M.

AU - Lotti, G.

AU - Prussi, M.

AU - Nistri, R.

AU - Chiaramonti, D.

AU - lópez-Contreras, A.M.

AU - Bos, H.L.

AU - Eggink, G.

AU - Springer, J.

AU - Bakker, R.

AU - van Ree, R.

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N2 - Numerous potential pathways to biofuels and biochemicals exist via the sugar platform1. This study uses literature surveys, market data and stakeholder input to provide a comprehensive evidence base for policymakers and industry – identifying the key benefits and development needs for the sugar platform. The study created a company database for 94 sugar-based products, with some already commercial, the majority at research/pilot stage, and only a few demonstration plants crossing the “valley of death”. Case studies describe the value proposition, market outlook and EU activity for ten value chains (acrylic, adipic & succinic acids, FDCA, BDO, farnesene, isobutene, PLA, PHAs and PE). Most can deliver significant greenhouse savings and drop-in (or improved) properties, but at an added cost to fossil alternatives. Whilst significant progress has been made, research barriers remain around lignocellulosic biomass fractionation, product separation energy, biological inhibition, chemical selectivity and monomer purity, plus improving whole chain process integration. An assessment of EU competitiveness highlights strengths in R&D, but a lack of strong commercial activity, due to the US, China and Brazil having more attractive feedstock and investment conditions. Further policy development, in particular for biochemicals, will be required to realise a competitive European sugar-based bioeconomy.

AB - Numerous potential pathways to biofuels and biochemicals exist via the sugar platform1. This study uses literature surveys, market data and stakeholder input to provide a comprehensive evidence base for policymakers and industry – identifying the key benefits and development needs for the sugar platform. The study created a company database for 94 sugar-based products, with some already commercial, the majority at research/pilot stage, and only a few demonstration plants crossing the “valley of death”. Case studies describe the value proposition, market outlook and EU activity for ten value chains (acrylic, adipic & succinic acids, FDCA, BDO, farnesene, isobutene, PLA, PHAs and PE). Most can deliver significant greenhouse savings and drop-in (or improved) properties, but at an added cost to fossil alternatives. Whilst significant progress has been made, research barriers remain around lignocellulosic biomass fractionation, product separation energy, biological inhibition, chemical selectivity and monomer purity, plus improving whole chain process integration. An assessment of EU competitiveness highlights strengths in R&D, but a lack of strong commercial activity, due to the US, China and Brazil having more attractive feedstock and investment conditions. Further policy development, in particular for biochemicals, will be required to realise a competitive European sugar-based bioeconomy.

KW - chemie op basis van biologische grondstoffen

KW - chemicaliën uit biologische grondstoffen

KW - gevalsanalyse

KW - suiker

KW - chemische industrie

KW - europa

KW - karteringen

KW - biobased economy

KW - biobased chemistry

KW - biobased chemicals

KW - case studies

KW - sugar

KW - chemical industry

KW - europe

KW - surveys

KW - biobased economy

M3 - Report

BT - From the Sugar Platform to biofuels and biochemicals : Final report for the European Commission Directorate-General Energy

PB - E4tech/Re-CORD/Wageningen UR

ER -

Taylor R, Nattrass L, Alberts G, Robson P, Chudziak C, Bauen A et al. From the Sugar Platform to biofuels and biochemicals : Final report for the European Commission Directorate-General Energy. E4tech/Re-CORD/Wageningen UR, 2015. 183 p.