Flushing meadows : the influence of management alternatives on the greenhouse gas balance of fen meadow areas

A.P. Schrier-Uijl

Research output: Thesisinternal PhD, WU

Abstract

The degradation of peatlands is a major and growing source of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and small changes in the management of peatlands can lead to drastic changes in GHG emissions and changes in carbon storage and in the past have indeed done so. GHG emissions from peatlands and the subsidence of peat soils can both probably be decreased by rewetting peatland and by restoring peatland by reducing the intensity of agricultural land use on peat soils. It might even be possible for these agricultural peatlands to revert to being sinks of GHGs. To test whether agricultural peat areas can be turned into GHG sinks and carbon sinks if they are restored and whether GHG emissions can at least be reduced by reducing management intensity and rewetting, a landscape-scale experiment measuring GHG emissions and carbon releases was started in 2005.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • Wageningen University
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Berendse, Frank, Promotor
  • Veenendaal, Elmar, Co-promotor
  • Leffelaar, Peter, Co-promotor
Award date10 Sep 2010
Place of Publication[S.l.
Print ISBNs9789085857181
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Keywords

  • grassland management
  • groundwater level
  • greenhouse effect
  • greenhouse gases
  • carbon dioxide
  • carbon cycle
  • carbon sequestration
  • netherlands
  • peat soils
  • peat grasslands
  • groundwater depletion

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