Field inactivation of wild-type and genetically modified Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus in cotton

X. Sun, X.C. Sun, W. van der Werf, J.M. Vlak, Z.H. Hu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera) is a serious pest on cotton in China. A specific baculovirus, H. armigera nucleopolyhedroviruses (HaSNPV) is used as a commercial biopesticide to control this pest. To improve the pesticidal properties, HaSNPV has been genetically engineered by both deleting the ecdysteroid UDP-glucosyltransferase (egt) gene from its genome (recombinant HaSNPV-EGTD) and incorporating an insect-selective toxin gene from the scorpion Androctonus australis (AaIT) (recombinant HaSNPV-AaIT). In the field, there was no significant difference among the inactivation rates of the two recombinant HaSNPVs and their parent wild-type, HaSNPV-WT. The inactivation rate of these viruses was significantly different in different years. The average half-life of HaSNPV was 0.57, 0.90 and 0.39 days in 2000, 2001 and 2002, respectively. Inactivation rates correlated well with solar radiation over these years.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)185-192
JournalBiocontrol Science and Technology
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Keywords

  • nuclear polyhedrosis-virus
  • heliothis
  • sunlight
  • lepidoptera
  • susceptibility
  • formulations
  • insecticide
  • toxin
  • moth

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