Fermentation of wheat: effects of backslopping different proportions of pre-fermented wheat on the microbial and chemical composition

C.A. Moran, R.H.J. Scholten, J.M. Tricarico, P.H. Brooks, M.W.A. Verstegen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of the study was to examine effect of backslop on the chemical and microbiological characteristics of fermented wheat (FW). Coarsely ground wheat was mixed with water (1:3 wt/wt) and inoculated with 6 log cfu ml(-1) each of an overnight culture of Lactobacillus plantarum and Pediococcus pentosaceus. Four fermentation treatments were conducted in 45 1, closed, PVC containers over 48 hours. Three treatments investigated the benefits of the addition of previously fermented wheat (backslopping, BSL) at different proportions (0.20, 0.33 or 0.42 kg) to freshly prepared wheat. The control treatment contained no addition of BSL. Elimination of coliforms from the FW within 48 h was only achieved through backslopping; where coliform bacteria counts decreased from approximately 6.5 log10 cfu ml(-1) to less than 3 log10 cfu ml(-1). There was no apparent advantage in increasing the backslop proportion above 0.20. However, the exclusion of coliform bacteria required the pH to remain below 4.0 for at a minimum of 24 h. The results of these studies indicate that fermentation of wheat has the potential to reduce the risk of feed-borne colibacillosis and provides a practical alternative to producers that cannot ferment multiple diets or have limited fermentation capacity.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)158-169
Number of pages12
JournalArchives of Animal Nutrition
Volume60
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Keywords

  • liquid compound diets
  • 6-day storage period
  • fed ad-libitum
  • organic-acids
  • coproducts
  • feed
  • pigs
  • performance
  • food

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