FeEDDHA-facilitated Fe uptake in relation to the behaviour of FeEDDHA components in the soil-plant system as a function of time and dosage.

W.D.C. Schenkeveld, E.J.M. Temminghoff, A.M. Reichwein, W.H. van Riemsdijk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

FeEDDHA products are widely used to prevent and remedy Fe chlorosis in crops grown on calcareous soils. These products consist of a mixture of FeEDDHA components: racemic o,o-FeEDDHA, meso o,o-FeEDDHA, o,p-FeEDDHA and rest-FeEDDHA. The FeEDDHA components differ in physical and chemical properties, and as a consequence also in effectiveness as Fe fertilizer. In order to efficiently match dose, frequency and moment of FeEDDHA application with the Fe requirements of plants, it is important to understand the behaviour of the FeEDDHA components in the soil-plant system as a function of time and dosage, and to relate this behaviour to Fe uptake by plants. These issues have been examined in a pot trial study with soybean plants (Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv Mycogen 5072) grown on calcareous soil from Santomera, Spain. Four FeEDDHA treatments (two compositions, two dosages) were applied prior to the set in of chlorosis. Leaching of FeEDDHA components was prevented. Plant and soil were sampled every week, for six weeks. From one week onward the Fe concentration in the pore water was largely gouverned by racemic and meso o,o-FeEDDHA. The concentration behaviour of the o,o-FeEDDHA isomers underwent two stages: a strong decline within the first week resulting from linear adsorption, and a gradual decline from one week onward. For meso o,o-FeEDDHA, unlike racemic o,o-FeDDHA, the gradual decline could be mathematically well described with an exponential decay function. Soybean plants mainly took up Fe in the progressed vegetative stage (3rd and 4th week) and in the reproductive stage, when the pods were being filled with seeds (6th week). Fe uptake and removal of racemic o,o-FeEDDHA from the soil system display a similar time-trend, whereas the removal of meso o,o-FeEDDHA had a plant-independent character. This indicates the removal of racemic o,o-FeEDDHA is to a larger extent plant-related
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-85
JournalPlant and Soil
Volume332
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Keywords

  • strategy i plants
  • calcareous soil
  • iron-chlorosis
  • acid o,p-eddha
  • pisum-sativum
  • eddha
  • bicarbonate
  • isomers
  • solubilization
  • fe(o,o-eddha)

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