Feasibility study thin glasses for greenhouse roof designs

Silke Hemming, Vida Mohammadkhani, Frank Kempkes, Anton Peters, Vincent Lieffrig, Keitaro Harada, Michiel van Spronsen, Tjibbe van der Werff, Christian Louter

Research output: Book/ReportReportProfessional

Abstract

In this study, the feasibility of the application of flexible thin glass in greenhouses was investigated. With the development of thin but very strong glass plates like for mobile phones, new possibilities are being created for new greenhouse roof designs, the usage in multi-layered glass roof give possibilities for high-insulation greenhouse coverings. Flexible thin glass is a tempered glass. While standard tempered glass goes through a thermal process, this is a chemical process, which makes the glass five times stronger, creating the possibility of thickness reduction and bending. By adding nanocoatings the reflection can be reduced and the light transmission can be increased. Multi-layered greenhouse roofs can be created, resulting in a higher light transmission than currently available multilayer polycarbonate (PC) sheets, but also a higher transmission than today’s insulating double glass. The study shows that such glass combinations lead to an additional 20% energy savings based on heat demand for Phalaenopsis. Thin glasses are particularly strong and can also be used in curved form. This makes new greenhouse roof designs with these glasses possible. Especially the low weight offers advantages here. Important mechanical aspects and bottlenecks for the use in greenhouses have been mapped out. Due to limitations in today’s available dimensions and high prices, the use of thin glass in greenhouses will be further away in the future
LanguageEnglish
Place of PublicationBleiswijk
PublisherWageningen University & Research, BU Greenhouse Horticulture
Number of pages50
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Publication series

NameWageningen University & Research, BU Greenhouse Horticulture report
No.WPR-732

Fingerprint

Greenhouses
Roofs
Glass
Light transmission
Roof coverings
Polycarbonates
Mobile phones
Insulation
Energy conservation
Multilayers

Cite this

Hemming, S., Mohammadkhani, V., Kempkes, F., Peters, A., Lieffrig, V., Harada, K., ... Louter, C. (2018). Feasibility study thin glasses for greenhouse roof designs. (Wageningen University & Research, BU Greenhouse Horticulture report; No. WPR-732). Bleiswijk: Wageningen University & Research, BU Greenhouse Horticulture. https://doi.org/10.18174/432087
Hemming, Silke ; Mohammadkhani, Vida ; Kempkes, Frank ; Peters, Anton ; Lieffrig, Vincent ; Harada, Keitaro ; van Spronsen, Michiel ; van der Werff, Tjibbe ; Louter, Christian. / Feasibility study thin glasses for greenhouse roof designs. Bleiswijk : Wageningen University & Research, BU Greenhouse Horticulture, 2018. 50 p. (Wageningen University & Research, BU Greenhouse Horticulture report; WPR-732).
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abstract = "In this study, the feasibility of the application of flexible thin glass in greenhouses was investigated. With the development of thin but very strong glass plates like for mobile phones, new possibilities are being created for new greenhouse roof designs, the usage in multi-layered glass roof give possibilities for high-insulation greenhouse coverings. Flexible thin glass is a tempered glass. While standard tempered glass goes through a thermal process, this is a chemical process, which makes the glass five times stronger, creating the possibility of thickness reduction and bending. By adding nanocoatings the reflection can be reduced and the light transmission can be increased. Multi-layered greenhouse roofs can be created, resulting in a higher light transmission than currently available multilayer polycarbonate (PC) sheets, but also a higher transmission than today’s insulating double glass. The study shows that such glass combinations lead to an additional 20{\%} energy savings based on heat demand for Phalaenopsis. Thin glasses are particularly strong and can also be used in curved form. This makes new greenhouse roof designs with these glasses possible. Especially the low weight offers advantages here. Important mechanical aspects and bottlenecks for the use in greenhouses have been mapped out. Due to limitations in today’s available dimensions and high prices, the use of thin glass in greenhouses will be further away in the future",
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Hemming, S, Mohammadkhani, V, Kempkes, F, Peters, A, Lieffrig, V, Harada, K, van Spronsen, M, van der Werff, T & Louter, C 2018, Feasibility study thin glasses for greenhouse roof designs. Wageningen University & Research, BU Greenhouse Horticulture report, no. WPR-732, Wageningen University & Research, BU Greenhouse Horticulture, Bleiswijk. https://doi.org/10.18174/432087

Feasibility study thin glasses for greenhouse roof designs. / Hemming, Silke; Mohammadkhani, Vida; Kempkes, Frank; Peters, Anton; Lieffrig, Vincent; Harada, Keitaro; van Spronsen, Michiel; van der Werff, Tjibbe; Louter, Christian.

Bleiswijk : Wageningen University & Research, BU Greenhouse Horticulture, 2018. 50 p. (Wageningen University & Research, BU Greenhouse Horticulture report; No. WPR-732).

Research output: Book/ReportReportProfessional

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AU - Hemming, Silke

AU - Mohammadkhani, Vida

AU - Kempkes, Frank

AU - Peters, Anton

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AU - Harada, Keitaro

AU - van Spronsen, Michiel

AU - van der Werff, Tjibbe

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N2 - In this study, the feasibility of the application of flexible thin glass in greenhouses was investigated. With the development of thin but very strong glass plates like for mobile phones, new possibilities are being created for new greenhouse roof designs, the usage in multi-layered glass roof give possibilities for high-insulation greenhouse coverings. Flexible thin glass is a tempered glass. While standard tempered glass goes through a thermal process, this is a chemical process, which makes the glass five times stronger, creating the possibility of thickness reduction and bending. By adding nanocoatings the reflection can be reduced and the light transmission can be increased. Multi-layered greenhouse roofs can be created, resulting in a higher light transmission than currently available multilayer polycarbonate (PC) sheets, but also a higher transmission than today’s insulating double glass. The study shows that such glass combinations lead to an additional 20% energy savings based on heat demand for Phalaenopsis. Thin glasses are particularly strong and can also be used in curved form. This makes new greenhouse roof designs with these glasses possible. Especially the low weight offers advantages here. Important mechanical aspects and bottlenecks for the use in greenhouses have been mapped out. Due to limitations in today’s available dimensions and high prices, the use of thin glass in greenhouses will be further away in the future

AB - In this study, the feasibility of the application of flexible thin glass in greenhouses was investigated. With the development of thin but very strong glass plates like for mobile phones, new possibilities are being created for new greenhouse roof designs, the usage in multi-layered glass roof give possibilities for high-insulation greenhouse coverings. Flexible thin glass is a tempered glass. While standard tempered glass goes through a thermal process, this is a chemical process, which makes the glass five times stronger, creating the possibility of thickness reduction and bending. By adding nanocoatings the reflection can be reduced and the light transmission can be increased. Multi-layered greenhouse roofs can be created, resulting in a higher light transmission than currently available multilayer polycarbonate (PC) sheets, but also a higher transmission than today’s insulating double glass. The study shows that such glass combinations lead to an additional 20% energy savings based on heat demand for Phalaenopsis. Thin glasses are particularly strong and can also be used in curved form. This makes new greenhouse roof designs with these glasses possible. Especially the low weight offers advantages here. Important mechanical aspects and bottlenecks for the use in greenhouses have been mapped out. Due to limitations in today’s available dimensions and high prices, the use of thin glass in greenhouses will be further away in the future

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DO - 10.18174/432087

M3 - Report

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BT - Feasibility study thin glasses for greenhouse roof designs

PB - Wageningen University & Research, BU Greenhouse Horticulture

CY - Bleiswijk

ER -

Hemming S, Mohammadkhani V, Kempkes F, Peters A, Lieffrig V, Harada K et al. Feasibility study thin glasses for greenhouse roof designs. Bleiswijk: Wageningen University & Research, BU Greenhouse Horticulture, 2018. 50 p. (Wageningen University & Research, BU Greenhouse Horticulture report; WPR-732). https://doi.org/10.18174/432087