Fate and effects of triclosan in subtropical river biofilms

Naisheng S. Zhang, Feng-Jiao Peng, G.G. Ying, P.J. van den Brink

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Triclosan (TCS, 5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) phenol) is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound. Owing to its wide use, TCS has been frequently detected in river systems, especially in the (sub-)tropics. However, little information on its interaction with river biofilm in the (sub)tropics is currently available. In the present study, subtropical river biofilms were chronically exposed to TCS for 14 d at concentrations of 0.1–100 μg/L in artificial river water, which was followed by a 7 d recovery period. The results show that 100 μg/L TCS inhibited the growth of river biofilms and the no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) of TCS on river biofilms was 10 μg/L. The affected biofilms did not completely recover within the 7 d of recovery period due to the adsorbed TCS which was not removed together with dissolved TCS. Exposure to TCS caused significant changes in prokaryotic species composition of river biofilms but no significant effects on eukaryotic species composition. In particular, the relative abundance of several TCS-tolerant bacterial species (e.g., Pseudoxanthomonas mexicana, Sphingopyxis alaskensis and Sphingomonas wittichii) in river biofilms increased following exposure to 10 and 100 μg/L TCS. River biofilm efficiently removed TCS from the liquid phase and the pH values of the aquatic system significantly affected the removal efficiency of TCS (from 36% at pH 6.5 to 60% at pH 8.5). No degradation products were detected in the liquid phase after 5 days of exposure, possibly due to strong adsorption of the hydrophobic degradation products to river biofilms and through biodegradation by bacteria utilizing TCS and its degradation products as source of carbon and energy for growth, such as Methyloversalitis universalis and Methylobacterium aquaticum.
LanguageEnglish
Pages11-19
JournalAquatic Toxicology
Volume212
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2019

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Triclosan
Biofilms
Rivers
biofilm
rivers
river
subtropics
Sphingomonas wittichii
degradation
Pseudoxanthomonas
Methylobacterium
effect
Sphingomonas
species diversity
liquid
liquids
dose-response relationship
river water
biodegradation
Growth

Cite this

Zhang, Naisheng S. ; Peng, Feng-Jiao ; Ying, G.G. ; van den Brink, P.J. / Fate and effects of triclosan in subtropical river biofilms. In: Aquatic Toxicology. 2019 ; Vol. 212. pp. 11-19.
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title = "Fate and effects of triclosan in subtropical river biofilms",
abstract = "Triclosan (TCS, 5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) phenol) is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound. Owing to its wide use, TCS has been frequently detected in river systems, especially in the (sub-)tropics. However, little information on its interaction with river biofilm in the (sub)tropics is currently available. In the present study, subtropical river biofilms were chronically exposed to TCS for 14 d at concentrations of 0.1–100 μg/L in artificial river water, which was followed by a 7 d recovery period. The results show that 100 μg/L TCS inhibited the growth of river biofilms and the no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) of TCS on river biofilms was 10 μg/L. The affected biofilms did not completely recover within the 7 d of recovery period due to the adsorbed TCS which was not removed together with dissolved TCS. Exposure to TCS caused significant changes in prokaryotic species composition of river biofilms but no significant effects on eukaryotic species composition. In particular, the relative abundance of several TCS-tolerant bacterial species (e.g., Pseudoxanthomonas mexicana, Sphingopyxis alaskensis and Sphingomonas wittichii) in river biofilms increased following exposure to 10 and 100 μg/L TCS. River biofilm efficiently removed TCS from the liquid phase and the pH values of the aquatic system significantly affected the removal efficiency of TCS (from 36{\%} at pH 6.5 to 60{\%} at pH 8.5). No degradation products were detected in the liquid phase after 5 days of exposure, possibly due to strong adsorption of the hydrophobic degradation products to river biofilms and through biodegradation by bacteria utilizing TCS and its degradation products as source of carbon and energy for growth, such as Methyloversalitis universalis and Methylobacterium aquaticum.",
author = "Zhang, {Naisheng S.} and Feng-Jiao Peng and G.G. Ying and {van den Brink}, P.J.",
year = "2019",
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doi = "10.1016/j.aquatox.2019.04.015",
language = "English",
volume = "212",
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Fate and effects of triclosan in subtropical river biofilms. / Zhang, Naisheng S.; Peng, Feng-Jiao; Ying, G.G.; van den Brink, P.J.

In: Aquatic Toxicology, Vol. 212, 07.2019, p. 11-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fate and effects of triclosan in subtropical river biofilms

AU - Zhang, Naisheng S.

AU - Peng, Feng-Jiao

AU - Ying, G.G.

AU - van den Brink, P.J.

PY - 2019/7

Y1 - 2019/7

N2 - Triclosan (TCS, 5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) phenol) is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound. Owing to its wide use, TCS has been frequently detected in river systems, especially in the (sub-)tropics. However, little information on its interaction with river biofilm in the (sub)tropics is currently available. In the present study, subtropical river biofilms were chronically exposed to TCS for 14 d at concentrations of 0.1–100 μg/L in artificial river water, which was followed by a 7 d recovery period. The results show that 100 μg/L TCS inhibited the growth of river biofilms and the no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) of TCS on river biofilms was 10 μg/L. The affected biofilms did not completely recover within the 7 d of recovery period due to the adsorbed TCS which was not removed together with dissolved TCS. Exposure to TCS caused significant changes in prokaryotic species composition of river biofilms but no significant effects on eukaryotic species composition. In particular, the relative abundance of several TCS-tolerant bacterial species (e.g., Pseudoxanthomonas mexicana, Sphingopyxis alaskensis and Sphingomonas wittichii) in river biofilms increased following exposure to 10 and 100 μg/L TCS. River biofilm efficiently removed TCS from the liquid phase and the pH values of the aquatic system significantly affected the removal efficiency of TCS (from 36% at pH 6.5 to 60% at pH 8.5). No degradation products were detected in the liquid phase after 5 days of exposure, possibly due to strong adsorption of the hydrophobic degradation products to river biofilms and through biodegradation by bacteria utilizing TCS and its degradation products as source of carbon and energy for growth, such as Methyloversalitis universalis and Methylobacterium aquaticum.

AB - Triclosan (TCS, 5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) phenol) is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound. Owing to its wide use, TCS has been frequently detected in river systems, especially in the (sub-)tropics. However, little information on its interaction with river biofilm in the (sub)tropics is currently available. In the present study, subtropical river biofilms were chronically exposed to TCS for 14 d at concentrations of 0.1–100 μg/L in artificial river water, which was followed by a 7 d recovery period. The results show that 100 μg/L TCS inhibited the growth of river biofilms and the no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) of TCS on river biofilms was 10 μg/L. The affected biofilms did not completely recover within the 7 d of recovery period due to the adsorbed TCS which was not removed together with dissolved TCS. Exposure to TCS caused significant changes in prokaryotic species composition of river biofilms but no significant effects on eukaryotic species composition. In particular, the relative abundance of several TCS-tolerant bacterial species (e.g., Pseudoxanthomonas mexicana, Sphingopyxis alaskensis and Sphingomonas wittichii) in river biofilms increased following exposure to 10 and 100 μg/L TCS. River biofilm efficiently removed TCS from the liquid phase and the pH values of the aquatic system significantly affected the removal efficiency of TCS (from 36% at pH 6.5 to 60% at pH 8.5). No degradation products were detected in the liquid phase after 5 days of exposure, possibly due to strong adsorption of the hydrophobic degradation products to river biofilms and through biodegradation by bacteria utilizing TCS and its degradation products as source of carbon and energy for growth, such as Methyloversalitis universalis and Methylobacterium aquaticum.

U2 - 10.1016/j.aquatox.2019.04.015

DO - 10.1016/j.aquatox.2019.04.015

M3 - Article

VL - 212

SP - 11

EP - 19

JO - Aquatic Toxicology

T2 - Aquatic Toxicology

JF - Aquatic Toxicology

SN - 0166-445X

ER -