Fasting ghrelin does not predict food intake after short-term energy restriction

W.A.M. Blom, M. Mars, H.F.J. Hendriks, C.P.G.M. de Groot, A. Stafleu, F.J. Kok, C. de Graaf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To study the role of ghrelin as a hunger signal during energy restriction and to test the hypothesis that changes in fasting leptin concentrations during energy restriction are associated with changes in fasting ghrelin concentrations. Research Methods and Procedures: Thirty-five healthy, lean men (23 ± 3 years of age; BMI: 22.3 ± 1.6 kg/m2) participated in a controlled intervention study. Fasting ghrelin and leptin concentrations were measured before and after 2 days of 62% energy restriction and after a 2-day period of ad libitum food intake. Energy intake during the latter period was assessed. Results: On average, ghrelin concentrations did not change (0.05 µg/liter; 95% confidence interval, ¿0.03; 0.12) during energy restriction. Changes in ghrelin concentration during energy restriction were not associated with energy intake during the ad libitum period (r = 0.07; not significant). Ad libitum energy intake was, however, associated with the change in ghrelin concentrations during the same period (r = ¿0.34; p = 0.05). Ghrelin and leptin concentrations were not associated. In addition, the ratio of percentage changes in ghrelin and leptin during energy restriction was not correlated with ad libitum food intake after energy restriction (r = ¿0.26; p = 0.14). Discussion: Fasting ghrelin concentrations did not rise after a 2-day energy restriction regimen. Moreover, changes in ghrelin concentrations during energy restriction were not associated with subsequent ad libitum food intake, suggesting that fasting ghrelin does not act as a hunger signal to the brain. The data did not support our hypothesis that leptin suppresses ghrelin levels
LanguageEnglish
Pages838-846
JournalObesity
Volume14
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Fingerprint

Ghrelin
Fasting
Eating
Leptin
Energy Intake
Hunger

Keywords

  • agouti-related protein
  • leptin concentrations
  • circulating ghrelin
  • young-women
  • body-weight
  • obesity
  • expenditure
  • receptor
  • rise
  • diet

Cite this

@article{13251215ae3f44a3877b2ab33a380137,
title = "Fasting ghrelin does not predict food intake after short-term energy restriction",
abstract = "Objective: To study the role of ghrelin as a hunger signal during energy restriction and to test the hypothesis that changes in fasting leptin concentrations during energy restriction are associated with changes in fasting ghrelin concentrations. Research Methods and Procedures: Thirty-five healthy, lean men (23 ± 3 years of age; BMI: 22.3 ± 1.6 kg/m2) participated in a controlled intervention study. Fasting ghrelin and leptin concentrations were measured before and after 2 days of 62{\%} energy restriction and after a 2-day period of ad libitum food intake. Energy intake during the latter period was assessed. Results: On average, ghrelin concentrations did not change (0.05 µg/liter; 95{\%} confidence interval, ¿0.03; 0.12) during energy restriction. Changes in ghrelin concentration during energy restriction were not associated with energy intake during the ad libitum period (r = 0.07; not significant). Ad libitum energy intake was, however, associated with the change in ghrelin concentrations during the same period (r = ¿0.34; p = 0.05). Ghrelin and leptin concentrations were not associated. In addition, the ratio of percentage changes in ghrelin and leptin during energy restriction was not correlated with ad libitum food intake after energy restriction (r = ¿0.26; p = 0.14). Discussion: Fasting ghrelin concentrations did not rise after a 2-day energy restriction regimen. Moreover, changes in ghrelin concentrations during energy restriction were not associated with subsequent ad libitum food intake, suggesting that fasting ghrelin does not act as a hunger signal to the brain. The data did not support our hypothesis that leptin suppresses ghrelin levels",
keywords = "agouti-related protein, leptin concentrations, circulating ghrelin, young-women, body-weight, obesity, expenditure, receptor, rise, diet",
author = "W.A.M. Blom and M. Mars and H.F.J. Hendriks and {de Groot}, C.P.G.M. and A. Stafleu and F.J. Kok and {de Graaf}, C.",
year = "2006",
doi = "10.1038/oby.2006.97",
language = "English",
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pages = "838--846",
journal = "Obesity",
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publisher = "Wiley",
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Fasting ghrelin does not predict food intake after short-term energy restriction. / Blom, W.A.M.; Mars, M.; Hendriks, H.F.J.; de Groot, C.P.G.M.; Stafleu, A.; Kok, F.J.; de Graaf, C.

In: Obesity, Vol. 14, No. 5, 2006, p. 838-846.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fasting ghrelin does not predict food intake after short-term energy restriction

AU - Blom, W.A.M.

AU - Mars, M.

AU - Hendriks, H.F.J.

AU - de Groot, C.P.G.M.

AU - Stafleu, A.

AU - Kok, F.J.

AU - de Graaf, C.

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - Objective: To study the role of ghrelin as a hunger signal during energy restriction and to test the hypothesis that changes in fasting leptin concentrations during energy restriction are associated with changes in fasting ghrelin concentrations. Research Methods and Procedures: Thirty-five healthy, lean men (23 ± 3 years of age; BMI: 22.3 ± 1.6 kg/m2) participated in a controlled intervention study. Fasting ghrelin and leptin concentrations were measured before and after 2 days of 62% energy restriction and after a 2-day period of ad libitum food intake. Energy intake during the latter period was assessed. Results: On average, ghrelin concentrations did not change (0.05 µg/liter; 95% confidence interval, ¿0.03; 0.12) during energy restriction. Changes in ghrelin concentration during energy restriction were not associated with energy intake during the ad libitum period (r = 0.07; not significant). Ad libitum energy intake was, however, associated with the change in ghrelin concentrations during the same period (r = ¿0.34; p = 0.05). Ghrelin and leptin concentrations were not associated. In addition, the ratio of percentage changes in ghrelin and leptin during energy restriction was not correlated with ad libitum food intake after energy restriction (r = ¿0.26; p = 0.14). Discussion: Fasting ghrelin concentrations did not rise after a 2-day energy restriction regimen. Moreover, changes in ghrelin concentrations during energy restriction were not associated with subsequent ad libitum food intake, suggesting that fasting ghrelin does not act as a hunger signal to the brain. The data did not support our hypothesis that leptin suppresses ghrelin levels

AB - Objective: To study the role of ghrelin as a hunger signal during energy restriction and to test the hypothesis that changes in fasting leptin concentrations during energy restriction are associated with changes in fasting ghrelin concentrations. Research Methods and Procedures: Thirty-five healthy, lean men (23 ± 3 years of age; BMI: 22.3 ± 1.6 kg/m2) participated in a controlled intervention study. Fasting ghrelin and leptin concentrations were measured before and after 2 days of 62% energy restriction and after a 2-day period of ad libitum food intake. Energy intake during the latter period was assessed. Results: On average, ghrelin concentrations did not change (0.05 µg/liter; 95% confidence interval, ¿0.03; 0.12) during energy restriction. Changes in ghrelin concentration during energy restriction were not associated with energy intake during the ad libitum period (r = 0.07; not significant). Ad libitum energy intake was, however, associated with the change in ghrelin concentrations during the same period (r = ¿0.34; p = 0.05). Ghrelin and leptin concentrations were not associated. In addition, the ratio of percentage changes in ghrelin and leptin during energy restriction was not correlated with ad libitum food intake after energy restriction (r = ¿0.26; p = 0.14). Discussion: Fasting ghrelin concentrations did not rise after a 2-day energy restriction regimen. Moreover, changes in ghrelin concentrations during energy restriction were not associated with subsequent ad libitum food intake, suggesting that fasting ghrelin does not act as a hunger signal to the brain. The data did not support our hypothesis that leptin suppresses ghrelin levels

KW - agouti-related protein

KW - leptin concentrations

KW - circulating ghrelin

KW - young-women

KW - body-weight

KW - obesity

KW - expenditure

KW - receptor

KW - rise

KW - diet

U2 - 10.1038/oby.2006.97

DO - 10.1038/oby.2006.97

M3 - Article

VL - 14

SP - 838

EP - 846

JO - Obesity

T2 - Obesity

JF - Obesity

SN - 1930-7381

IS - 5

ER -