Farmers' beliefs and voluntary vaccination schemes: Bluetongue in Dutch dairy cattle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background This research utilizes the Reasoned Action Approach framework to study which beliefs drive the intention of farmers to participate in a voluntary vaccination scheme against Bluetongue. Scope and approach Knowing the driving beliefs can help in selecting an appropriate mix of policy instruments to enhance the participation rate and thereby improve the cost-effectiveness and efficiency of voluntary vaccination strategies. Results are used to evaluate the policy instruments used by the Dutch government in their 2008 vaccination strategy (communicative intervention and vaccine subsidization). Key findings and conclusions The paper posits that social interaction mechanisms, such as peer group pressure, might advance the design of voluntary vaccination strategies.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)40-49
JournalFood Policy
Volume57
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Bluetongue
bluetongue
vaccination
dairy cattle
cattle
Vaccination
farmer
farmers
Peer Group
peer group
vaccine
cost effectiveness
peers
Interpersonal Relations
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Vaccines
vaccines
efficiency
participation
Farmers

Cite this

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title = "Farmers' beliefs and voluntary vaccination schemes: Bluetongue in Dutch dairy cattle",
abstract = "Background This research utilizes the Reasoned Action Approach framework to study which beliefs drive the intention of farmers to participate in a voluntary vaccination scheme against Bluetongue. Scope and approach Knowing the driving beliefs can help in selecting an appropriate mix of policy instruments to enhance the participation rate and thereby improve the cost-effectiveness and efficiency of voluntary vaccination strategies. Results are used to evaluate the policy instruments used by the Dutch government in their 2008 vaccination strategy (communicative intervention and vaccine subsidization). Key findings and conclusions The paper posits that social interaction mechanisms, such as peer group pressure, might advance the design of voluntary vaccination strategies.",
author = "J. Sok and H. Hogeveen and A.R.W. Elbers and {Oude Lansink}, A.G.J.M.",
year = "2015",
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language = "English",
volume = "57",
pages = "40--49",
journal = "Food Policy",
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Farmers' beliefs and voluntary vaccination schemes: Bluetongue in Dutch dairy cattle. / Sok, J.; Hogeveen, H.; Elbers, A.R.W.; Oude Lansink, A.G.J.M.

In: Food Policy, Vol. 57, 2015, p. 40-49.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Farmers' beliefs and voluntary vaccination schemes: Bluetongue in Dutch dairy cattle

AU - Sok, J.

AU - Hogeveen, H.

AU - Elbers, A.R.W.

AU - Oude Lansink, A.G.J.M.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Background This research utilizes the Reasoned Action Approach framework to study which beliefs drive the intention of farmers to participate in a voluntary vaccination scheme against Bluetongue. Scope and approach Knowing the driving beliefs can help in selecting an appropriate mix of policy instruments to enhance the participation rate and thereby improve the cost-effectiveness and efficiency of voluntary vaccination strategies. Results are used to evaluate the policy instruments used by the Dutch government in their 2008 vaccination strategy (communicative intervention and vaccine subsidization). Key findings and conclusions The paper posits that social interaction mechanisms, such as peer group pressure, might advance the design of voluntary vaccination strategies.

AB - Background This research utilizes the Reasoned Action Approach framework to study which beliefs drive the intention of farmers to participate in a voluntary vaccination scheme against Bluetongue. Scope and approach Knowing the driving beliefs can help in selecting an appropriate mix of policy instruments to enhance the participation rate and thereby improve the cost-effectiveness and efficiency of voluntary vaccination strategies. Results are used to evaluate the policy instruments used by the Dutch government in their 2008 vaccination strategy (communicative intervention and vaccine subsidization). Key findings and conclusions The paper posits that social interaction mechanisms, such as peer group pressure, might advance the design of voluntary vaccination strategies.

U2 - 10.1016/j.foodpol.2015.09.006

DO - 10.1016/j.foodpol.2015.09.006

M3 - Article

VL - 57

SP - 40

EP - 49

JO - Food Policy

JF - Food Policy

SN - 0306-9192

ER -