Factors determining the timing of swarming of European flat oyster (Ostrea edulis L.) larvae in the Dutch Delta area: Implications for flat oyster restoration

Margot A.M. Maathuis, Joop W.P. Coolen, Tom Van Der Have, Pauline Kamermans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Flat oyster (Ostrea edulis L.) beds were once a dominant habitat type in the Dutch Delta and North Sea, but overharvesting resulted in soft sediment habitats devoid of oysters. Natural recovery of oyster beds will be slow if the natural substrate is lost and therefore, many oyster restoration projects have been set up worldwide. One way to enhance the success rate of restoring flat oyster beds is adding substrate at the moment that larvae are ready to settle. For this, more insight into the drivers of the timing of larval release is needed, which was the aim of this study. Generalized Additive Models (GAMs) were created based on historical data form the Oosterschelde and Lake Grevelingen of the abundance of swarming flat oyster larvae. It was shown that the temperature explains major part of the variation of larval occurrence. The addition of the temperature sum gave best results in the Oosterschelde. It was shown that the first peak in number of oyster larvae was predicted at a temperature sum of 576 degreedays. In Lake Grevelingen daily temperature yielded higher deviance explained values.
Furthermore, the lunar cycle also contributed to the timing of larval release in the Oosterschelde, but not in the Lake Grevelingen, most likely since tides are absent in this waterbody. Chlorophyll-a partly explained larval occurrence in Lake Grevelingen, suggesting food abundance is another driving factor in the timing of gametogenetic processes of flat oysters. Furthermore, day-in-year and mean temperature also contribute significantly to the timing of larval swarming in both water bodies. When validated, this information can be used to predict the
optimal time window of deployment of substrate for spat settlement in order to increase the success rate of oyster bed restoration.
Original languageEnglish
Article number101828
JournalJournal of Sea Research
Volume156
Early online date1 Dec 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2020

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Ostrea edulis
swarming
oysters
larva
larvae
lake
substrate
oyster larvae
temperature
lakes
lunar cycle
heat sums
spit
habitat type
chlorophyll a
tide
food
restoration
habitats
North Sea

Cite this

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title = "Factors determining the timing of swarming of European flat oyster (Ostrea edulis L.) larvae in the Dutch Delta area: Implications for flat oyster restoration",
abstract = "Flat oyster (Ostrea edulis L.) beds were once a dominant habitat type in the Dutch Delta and North Sea, but overharvesting resulted in soft sediment habitats devoid of oysters. Natural recovery of oyster beds will be slow if the natural substrate is lost and therefore, many oyster restoration projects have been set up worldwide. One way to enhance the success rate of restoring flat oyster beds is adding substrate at the moment that larvae are ready to settle. For this, more insight into the drivers of the timing of larval release is needed, which was the aim of this study. Generalized Additive Models (GAMs) were created based on historical data form the Oosterschelde and Lake Grevelingen of the abundance of swarming flat oyster larvae. It was shown that the temperature explains major part of the variation of larval occurrence. The addition of the temperature sum gave best results in the Oosterschelde. It was shown that the first peak in number of oyster larvae was predicted at a temperature sum of 576 degreedays. In Lake Grevelingen daily temperature yielded higher deviance explained values.Furthermore, the lunar cycle also contributed to the timing of larval release in the Oosterschelde, but not in the Lake Grevelingen, most likely since tides are absent in this waterbody. Chlorophyll-a partly explained larval occurrence in Lake Grevelingen, suggesting food abundance is another driving factor in the timing of gametogenetic processes of flat oysters. Furthermore, day-in-year and mean temperature also contribute significantly to the timing of larval swarming in both water bodies. When validated, this information can be used to predict theoptimal time window of deployment of substrate for spat settlement in order to increase the success rate of oyster bed restoration.",
author = "Maathuis, {Margot A.M.} and Coolen, {Joop W.P.} and {Van Der Have}, Tom and Pauline Kamermans",
year = "2020",
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doi = "10.1016/j.seares.2019.101828",
language = "English",
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journal = "Journal of Sea Research",
issn = "1385-1101",
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Factors determining the timing of swarming of European flat oyster (Ostrea edulis L.) larvae in the Dutch Delta area: Implications for flat oyster restoration. / Maathuis, Margot A.M.; Coolen, Joop W.P.; Van Der Have, Tom; Kamermans, Pauline.

In: Journal of Sea Research, Vol. 156, 101828, 01.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Factors determining the timing of swarming of European flat oyster (Ostrea edulis L.) larvae in the Dutch Delta area: Implications for flat oyster restoration

AU - Maathuis, Margot A.M.

AU - Coolen, Joop W.P.

AU - Van Der Have, Tom

AU - Kamermans, Pauline

PY - 2020/1

Y1 - 2020/1

N2 - Flat oyster (Ostrea edulis L.) beds were once a dominant habitat type in the Dutch Delta and North Sea, but overharvesting resulted in soft sediment habitats devoid of oysters. Natural recovery of oyster beds will be slow if the natural substrate is lost and therefore, many oyster restoration projects have been set up worldwide. One way to enhance the success rate of restoring flat oyster beds is adding substrate at the moment that larvae are ready to settle. For this, more insight into the drivers of the timing of larval release is needed, which was the aim of this study. Generalized Additive Models (GAMs) were created based on historical data form the Oosterschelde and Lake Grevelingen of the abundance of swarming flat oyster larvae. It was shown that the temperature explains major part of the variation of larval occurrence. The addition of the temperature sum gave best results in the Oosterschelde. It was shown that the first peak in number of oyster larvae was predicted at a temperature sum of 576 degreedays. In Lake Grevelingen daily temperature yielded higher deviance explained values.Furthermore, the lunar cycle also contributed to the timing of larval release in the Oosterschelde, but not in the Lake Grevelingen, most likely since tides are absent in this waterbody. Chlorophyll-a partly explained larval occurrence in Lake Grevelingen, suggesting food abundance is another driving factor in the timing of gametogenetic processes of flat oysters. Furthermore, day-in-year and mean temperature also contribute significantly to the timing of larval swarming in both water bodies. When validated, this information can be used to predict theoptimal time window of deployment of substrate for spat settlement in order to increase the success rate of oyster bed restoration.

AB - Flat oyster (Ostrea edulis L.) beds were once a dominant habitat type in the Dutch Delta and North Sea, but overharvesting resulted in soft sediment habitats devoid of oysters. Natural recovery of oyster beds will be slow if the natural substrate is lost and therefore, many oyster restoration projects have been set up worldwide. One way to enhance the success rate of restoring flat oyster beds is adding substrate at the moment that larvae are ready to settle. For this, more insight into the drivers of the timing of larval release is needed, which was the aim of this study. Generalized Additive Models (GAMs) were created based on historical data form the Oosterschelde and Lake Grevelingen of the abundance of swarming flat oyster larvae. It was shown that the temperature explains major part of the variation of larval occurrence. The addition of the temperature sum gave best results in the Oosterschelde. It was shown that the first peak in number of oyster larvae was predicted at a temperature sum of 576 degreedays. In Lake Grevelingen daily temperature yielded higher deviance explained values.Furthermore, the lunar cycle also contributed to the timing of larval release in the Oosterschelde, but not in the Lake Grevelingen, most likely since tides are absent in this waterbody. Chlorophyll-a partly explained larval occurrence in Lake Grevelingen, suggesting food abundance is another driving factor in the timing of gametogenetic processes of flat oysters. Furthermore, day-in-year and mean temperature also contribute significantly to the timing of larval swarming in both water bodies. When validated, this information can be used to predict theoptimal time window of deployment of substrate for spat settlement in order to increase the success rate of oyster bed restoration.

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DO - 10.1016/j.seares.2019.101828

M3 - Article

VL - 156

JO - Journal of Sea Research

JF - Journal of Sea Research

SN - 1385-1101

M1 - 101828

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