Exploring the potential of using ion mobility-mass spectrometry to separate matrix interferences from analytes in food control

Sjors Rasker, Marco H. Blokland, Toine F.H. Bovee, Ane Arrizabalaga-Larrañaga*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

During residue analysis in complex matrices for food safety purposes, interfering signals can sometimes overlap with those of the analyte of interest. Access to an additional separation dimension besides chromatographic and mass separation, such as ion mobility, can aid in removing interfering signals, allowing for correct analyte identification in these cases. In our laboratory, during routine LC−MS/MS analysis of liver samples for growth promoter residues, an interfering signal was found that matches the retention time and m/z values for stanozolol, a synthetic anabolic steroid. In the present work, the performance of a liquid chromatography coupled to ion mobility mass spectrometry (LC−IM−MS) method has been evaluated to study whether this LC−MS/MS false positive in liver samples could be eliminated by LC−IM−MS analysis. A cyclic ion mobility system already allowed the separation of stanozolol from the interfering peak after only one pass, showing a significant improvement compared to the conventional LC−MS/MS method. Additionally, collisional cross section (CCS) values were calculated and successfully compared with those from literature for identification purposes, eventually allowing both the identification and quantification of stanozolol in this complex matrix.

Original languageEnglish
Article number124086
JournalJournal of Chromatography B: Analytical Technologies in the Biomedical and Life Sciences
Volume1237
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Apr 2024

Keywords

  • Anabolic steroids
  • CCS
  • Cyclic ion mobility
  • Identification
  • Liver

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