Examines the motives and experiences of migrants to Cuba from the British Isles in the 19th Century

J.M. Curry Machado

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    Migrants from the British Isles played a hitherto little recognised part in the development of Cuban society and economy in the nineteenth century. Although not a numerically large migration, British and Irish merchants, professionals and, above all, workers had a significance for Cuba out of proportion to the numbers involved. They contributed to the development of Cuba’s international commerce, to both the outlawing and the hidden continuation of slavery, to the technological development of the sugar industry, and to the modernisation of the island. However, there is little evidence of a ‘British’ community existing, and the ‘British’ identity of the migrants was at best ambiguous and more often than not subsumed within a broader definition of what it meant to be ‘white’ and ‘foreign’ in Cuba at this time. The article draws on extensive original archival research in Britain and Cuba
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)25-36
    JournalInternational Journal of Cuban Studies
    Volume2
    Issue number3
    Publication statusPublished - 2009

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Examines the motives and experiences of migrants to Cuba from the British Isles in the 19th Century'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this