Evaluating the microbial diversity of an in vitro model of the human large intestine by phylogenetic microarray analysis

M. Rajilic-Stojanovic, A. Maathuis, G.H.J. Heilig, K. Venema, W.M. de Vos, H. Smidt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A high-density phylogenetic microarray targeting small subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA) sequences of over 1000 microbial phylotypes of the human gastrointestinal tract, the HITChip, was used to assess the impact of faecal inoculum preparation and operation conditions on an in vitro model of the human large intestine (TIM-2). This revealed that propagation of mixed faecal donations for the production of standardized inocula has only a limited effect on the microbiota composition, with slight changes observed mainly within the Firmicutes. Adversely, significant shifts in several major groups of intestinal microbiota were observed after inoculation of the in vitro model. Hierarchical cluster analysis was able to show that samples taken throughout the inoculum preparation grouped with microbiota profiles observed for faecal samples of healthy adults. In contrast, the TIM-2 microbiota was distinct. While members of the Bacteroidetes and some groups within the Bacilli were increased in TIM-2 microbiota, a strong reduction in the relative abundance of other microbial groups, including Bifidobacterium spp., Streptococcus spp., and Clostridium clusters IV and XIVa, was observed. The changes detected with the HITChip could be confirmed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of SSU rRNA amplicons
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3270-3281
JournalMicrobiology
Volume156
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Keywords

  • continuous-culture system
  • 16s ribosomal-rna
  • gastrointestinal-tract microbiota
  • gradient gel-electrophoresis
  • human colon
  • human gut
  • fecal bacteria
  • retention time
  • fermentation
  • communities

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Evaluating the microbial diversity of an in vitro model of the human large intestine by phylogenetic microarray analysis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this