Estimation of the water cycle related to shale gas production under high data uncertainties: Dutch perspective

Andrii Butkovskyi, Gijsbert Cirkel, Elvira Bozileva, Harry Bruning, Annemarie P. Van Wezel, Huub H.M. Rijnaarts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The potential water demand for fracturing fluids along with the possible flowback and produced water production is assessed for the Dutch Posidonia shale. Total water demand estimated for 25 years of the field development using historic data from the U.S. plays varies between 12.2 and 36.9 Mm3. The maximal annual water consumption of 0.95–2.88 Mm3 is expected in the peak years of shale gas production. These figures are much lower than the availability of any potential water sources, which include drinking water, fresh and brackish groundwater, river water, effluents of wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) and sea water. River water is considered the most promising water source for fracturing fluids in the Dutch Posidonia shale based on its availability (>6·104 Mm3/year) and quality (only bacterial composition needs to be controlled). Total wastewater production for the whole period of the field development is estimated between 6.6 and 48.0 Mm3. Wastewater recycling can cover significant part of the source water demand for fracturing fluid. However, high mineral content of the wastewater as well as temporal and spatial discrepancies between wastewater production and water demand will form obstacles for wastewater recycling. The assessment framework developed in this study may be applied for other shale gas fields with high uncertainties regarding subsurface properties, connate formation water characteristics and future legislative framework.

LanguageEnglish
Pages483-493
JournalJournal of Environmental Management
Volume231
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2019

Fingerprint

gas production
water demand
wastewater
Water
Wastewater
Fracturing fluids
river water
fluid
shale
water
recycling
formation water
gas field
Shale
Recycling
drinking water
shale gas
Uncertainty
Shale gas
effluent

Keywords

  • Fracturing fluid
  • Posidonia shale
  • Produced water
  • Shale gas
  • Wastewater recycling

Cite this

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title = "Estimation of the water cycle related to shale gas production under high data uncertainties: Dutch perspective",
abstract = "The potential water demand for fracturing fluids along with the possible flowback and produced water production is assessed for the Dutch Posidonia shale. Total water demand estimated for 25 years of the field development using historic data from the U.S. plays varies between 12.2 and 36.9 Mm3. The maximal annual water consumption of 0.95–2.88 Mm3 is expected in the peak years of shale gas production. These figures are much lower than the availability of any potential water sources, which include drinking water, fresh and brackish groundwater, river water, effluents of wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) and sea water. River water is considered the most promising water source for fracturing fluids in the Dutch Posidonia shale based on its availability (>6·104 Mm3/year) and quality (only bacterial composition needs to be controlled). Total wastewater production for the whole period of the field development is estimated between 6.6 and 48.0 Mm3. Wastewater recycling can cover significant part of the source water demand for fracturing fluid. However, high mineral content of the wastewater as well as temporal and spatial discrepancies between wastewater production and water demand will form obstacles for wastewater recycling. The assessment framework developed in this study may be applied for other shale gas fields with high uncertainties regarding subsurface properties, connate formation water characteristics and future legislative framework.",
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Estimation of the water cycle related to shale gas production under high data uncertainties : Dutch perspective. / Butkovskyi, Andrii; Cirkel, Gijsbert; Bozileva, Elvira; Bruning, Harry; Van Wezel, Annemarie P.; Rijnaarts, Huub H.M.

In: Journal of Environmental Management, Vol. 231, 01.02.2019, p. 483-493.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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T1 - Estimation of the water cycle related to shale gas production under high data uncertainties

T2 - Journal of Environmental Management

AU - Butkovskyi, Andrii

AU - Cirkel, Gijsbert

AU - Bozileva, Elvira

AU - Bruning, Harry

AU - Van Wezel, Annemarie P.

AU - Rijnaarts, Huub H.M.

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N2 - The potential water demand for fracturing fluids along with the possible flowback and produced water production is assessed for the Dutch Posidonia shale. Total water demand estimated for 25 years of the field development using historic data from the U.S. plays varies between 12.2 and 36.9 Mm3. The maximal annual water consumption of 0.95–2.88 Mm3 is expected in the peak years of shale gas production. These figures are much lower than the availability of any potential water sources, which include drinking water, fresh and brackish groundwater, river water, effluents of wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) and sea water. River water is considered the most promising water source for fracturing fluids in the Dutch Posidonia shale based on its availability (>6·104 Mm3/year) and quality (only bacterial composition needs to be controlled). Total wastewater production for the whole period of the field development is estimated between 6.6 and 48.0 Mm3. Wastewater recycling can cover significant part of the source water demand for fracturing fluid. However, high mineral content of the wastewater as well as temporal and spatial discrepancies between wastewater production and water demand will form obstacles for wastewater recycling. The assessment framework developed in this study may be applied for other shale gas fields with high uncertainties regarding subsurface properties, connate formation water characteristics and future legislative framework.

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