Establishment of wildflower fields in poor quality landscapes enhances micro-parasite prevalence in wild bumble bees

Niels Piot, Ivan Meeus, David Kleijn, Jeroen Scheper, Theo Linders, Guy Smagghe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The current worldwide pollinator decline is caused by the interplay of different drivers. Several strategies have been undertaken to counteract or halt this decline, one of which is the implementation of wildflower fields. These supplementary flowers provide extra food resources and have proven their success in increasing pollinator biodiversity and abundance. Yet such landscape alterations could also alter the host–pathogen dynamics of pollinators, which could affect the populations. In this study, we investigated the influence of sown wildflower fields on the prevalence of micro-parasites and viruses in the wild bumble bee Bombus pascuorum, one of the most abundant bumble bee species in Europe and the Netherlands. We found that the effect of sown wildflower fields on micro-parasite prevalence is affected by the composition of the surrounding landscape and the size of the flower field. The prevalence of micro-parasites increases with increasing size of sown wildflower fields in landscapes with few semi-natural landscape elements. This effect was not observed in landscapes with a high amount of semi-natural landscape elements. We elaborate on two mechanisms which can support these findings: (1) “transmission hot spots” within the altered flower-networks, which could negatively impact hosts experiencing an increased exposure; (2) improved tolerance of the hosts, withstanding higher parasite populations.

LanguageEnglish
Pages149-158
JournalOecologia
Volume189
Issue number1
Early online date7 Nov 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Fingerprint

parasite prevalence
wild flowers
Bombus
bee
parasites
pollinator
pollinating insects
flower
parasite
flowers
Bombus pascuorum
virus
pathogen
tolerance
biodiversity
Netherlands
food
resource
viruses
pathogens

Keywords

  • Bumble bee
  • Conservation
  • Flower mixes
  • Host–pathogen
  • Parasites

Cite this

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title = "Establishment of wildflower fields in poor quality landscapes enhances micro-parasite prevalence in wild bumble bees",
abstract = "The current worldwide pollinator decline is caused by the interplay of different drivers. Several strategies have been undertaken to counteract or halt this decline, one of which is the implementation of wildflower fields. These supplementary flowers provide extra food resources and have proven their success in increasing pollinator biodiversity and abundance. Yet such landscape alterations could also alter the host–pathogen dynamics of pollinators, which could affect the populations. In this study, we investigated the influence of sown wildflower fields on the prevalence of micro-parasites and viruses in the wild bumble bee Bombus pascuorum, one of the most abundant bumble bee species in Europe and the Netherlands. We found that the effect of sown wildflower fields on micro-parasite prevalence is affected by the composition of the surrounding landscape and the size of the flower field. The prevalence of micro-parasites increases with increasing size of sown wildflower fields in landscapes with few semi-natural landscape elements. This effect was not observed in landscapes with a high amount of semi-natural landscape elements. We elaborate on two mechanisms which can support these findings: (1) “transmission hot spots” within the altered flower-networks, which could negatively impact hosts experiencing an increased exposure; (2) improved tolerance of the hosts, withstanding higher parasite populations.",
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Establishment of wildflower fields in poor quality landscapes enhances micro-parasite prevalence in wild bumble bees. / Piot, Niels; Meeus, Ivan; Kleijn, David; Scheper, Jeroen; Linders, Theo; Smagghe, Guy.

In: Oecologia, Vol. 189, No. 1, 2019, p. 149-158.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AU - Smagghe, Guy

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