Enrichment of sulfidogenic bacteria from the human intestinal tract

Yuan Feng, Fons Stams, Willem M. de Vos, Irene Sánchez-Andrea*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalLetterAcademicpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hydrogen sulfide is formed in the human intestinal tract as the end product of the anaerobic microbial degradation of sulfur compounds present in mucus, bile or proteins. Since human gut microbial sulfur metabolism has been poorly characterized, we aimed to identify and isolate the microorganisms involved in sulfide formation. Fresh fecal samples from one healthy donor and one diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome were used as inocula for enrichments that were supplemented with sulfate or sulfite as electron acceptors in combination with different electron donors. After two transfers, cultures with high sulfide production were selected and the phylogenetic composition of the enriched microbial communities was determined. Sulfite respiration and cysteine degradation were the dominant sulfidogenic processes, and the most abundant bacteria enriched belonged to Bilophila and Clostridium cluster XIVa. Different isolates were obtained and remarkably included a novel sulfite reducer, designated strain 2C. Strain 2C belongs to the Veillonellaceae family of Firmicutes phylum and showed limited (91%) 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with that of known Sporomusa species and hence may represent a novel genus. This study indicates that bacteria that utilize sulfite and organic sulfur compounds rather than merely sulfate are relevant for human intestinal sulfur metabolism.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberfnx028
Number of pages7
JournalFEMS Microbiology Letters
Volume364
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Sulfites
Bacteria
Sulfur Compounds
Sulfides
Sulfur
Veillonellaceae
Bilophila
Sulfates
Electrons
Hydrogen Sulfide
Clostridium
Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Mucus
rRNA Genes
Bile
Cysteine
Respiration
Proteins

Keywords

  • Bile
  • Human gut microbiota
  • Sulfide
  • Sulfite-reducing bacteria
  • Taurine fermentation

Cite this

@article{344dbedc687545558e053043b6bd8aa0,
title = "Enrichment of sulfidogenic bacteria from the human intestinal tract",
abstract = "Hydrogen sulfide is formed in the human intestinal tract as the end product of the anaerobic microbial degradation of sulfur compounds present in mucus, bile or proteins. Since human gut microbial sulfur metabolism has been poorly characterized, we aimed to identify and isolate the microorganisms involved in sulfide formation. Fresh fecal samples from one healthy donor and one diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome were used as inocula for enrichments that were supplemented with sulfate or sulfite as electron acceptors in combination with different electron donors. After two transfers, cultures with high sulfide production were selected and the phylogenetic composition of the enriched microbial communities was determined. Sulfite respiration and cysteine degradation were the dominant sulfidogenic processes, and the most abundant bacteria enriched belonged to Bilophila and Clostridium cluster XIVa. Different isolates were obtained and remarkably included a novel sulfite reducer, designated strain 2C. Strain 2C belongs to the Veillonellaceae family of Firmicutes phylum and showed limited (91{\%}) 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with that of known Sporomusa species and hence may represent a novel genus. This study indicates that bacteria that utilize sulfite and organic sulfur compounds rather than merely sulfate are relevant for human intestinal sulfur metabolism.",
keywords = "Bile, Human gut microbiota, Sulfide, Sulfite-reducing bacteria, Taurine fermentation",
author = "Yuan Feng and Fons Stams and {de Vos}, {Willem M.} and Irene S{\'a}nchez-Andrea",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1093/femsle/fnx028",
language = "English",
volume = "364",
journal = "FEMS Microbiology Letters",
issn = "0378-1097",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
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Enrichment of sulfidogenic bacteria from the human intestinal tract. / Feng, Yuan; Stams, Fons; de Vos, Willem M.; Sánchez-Andrea, Irene.

In: FEMS Microbiology Letters, Vol. 364, No. 4, fnx028, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalLetterAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Enrichment of sulfidogenic bacteria from the human intestinal tract

AU - Feng, Yuan

AU - Stams, Fons

AU - de Vos, Willem M.

AU - Sánchez-Andrea, Irene

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Hydrogen sulfide is formed in the human intestinal tract as the end product of the anaerobic microbial degradation of sulfur compounds present in mucus, bile or proteins. Since human gut microbial sulfur metabolism has been poorly characterized, we aimed to identify and isolate the microorganisms involved in sulfide formation. Fresh fecal samples from one healthy donor and one diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome were used as inocula for enrichments that were supplemented with sulfate or sulfite as electron acceptors in combination with different electron donors. After two transfers, cultures with high sulfide production were selected and the phylogenetic composition of the enriched microbial communities was determined. Sulfite respiration and cysteine degradation were the dominant sulfidogenic processes, and the most abundant bacteria enriched belonged to Bilophila and Clostridium cluster XIVa. Different isolates were obtained and remarkably included a novel sulfite reducer, designated strain 2C. Strain 2C belongs to the Veillonellaceae family of Firmicutes phylum and showed limited (91%) 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with that of known Sporomusa species and hence may represent a novel genus. This study indicates that bacteria that utilize sulfite and organic sulfur compounds rather than merely sulfate are relevant for human intestinal sulfur metabolism.

AB - Hydrogen sulfide is formed in the human intestinal tract as the end product of the anaerobic microbial degradation of sulfur compounds present in mucus, bile or proteins. Since human gut microbial sulfur metabolism has been poorly characterized, we aimed to identify and isolate the microorganisms involved in sulfide formation. Fresh fecal samples from one healthy donor and one diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome were used as inocula for enrichments that were supplemented with sulfate or sulfite as electron acceptors in combination with different electron donors. After two transfers, cultures with high sulfide production were selected and the phylogenetic composition of the enriched microbial communities was determined. Sulfite respiration and cysteine degradation were the dominant sulfidogenic processes, and the most abundant bacteria enriched belonged to Bilophila and Clostridium cluster XIVa. Different isolates were obtained and remarkably included a novel sulfite reducer, designated strain 2C. Strain 2C belongs to the Veillonellaceae family of Firmicutes phylum and showed limited (91%) 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with that of known Sporomusa species and hence may represent a novel genus. This study indicates that bacteria that utilize sulfite and organic sulfur compounds rather than merely sulfate are relevant for human intestinal sulfur metabolism.

KW - Bile

KW - Human gut microbiota

KW - Sulfide

KW - Sulfite-reducing bacteria

KW - Taurine fermentation

U2 - 10.1093/femsle/fnx028

DO - 10.1093/femsle/fnx028

M3 - Letter

VL - 364

JO - FEMS Microbiology Letters

JF - FEMS Microbiology Letters

SN - 0378-1097

IS - 4

M1 - fnx028

ER -