Encapsulation of lipids as emulsion-alginate beads reduces food intake: a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over human trial in overweight adults

Meinou N. Corstens, Freddy J. Troost, Annick M.E. Alleleyn, Tim Klaassen, Claire C. Berton-Carabin, Karin Schroën, Ad A.M. Masclee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of lipid emulsions encapsulated in calcium-alginate beads in reducing food intake and appetite sensations. These emulsion-alginate beads were ingested in a yogurt (active) and compared to an equienergetic yogurt containing nonencapsulated nutrients with comparable sensory properties (control) in a randomized placebo-controlled trial with crossover design. Thirty-three healthy overweight volunteers (mean age: 43 years; body mass index: 27.7 kg/m2; 14 male) received the 2 treatments. Test days started with a standardized small breakfast (t = 0) followed by an active or control yogurt (t = 90 minutes). Appetite sensations and gastrointestinal symptoms were monitored prior to and after consumption of the yogurt, and food intake was measured during ad libitum pasta meal consumption (t = 210 minutes). The hypothesis for this study was that delayed release of encapsulated lipids suppresses appetite sensations and reduces food intake. Food intake was significantly reduced with 51 ± 20 kcal (213 ± 84 kJ) (P =.016) after intake of the active yogurt (770 ± 38 kcal (3222 ± 159 kJ)) compared to the control (821 ± 40 kcal (3435 ± 167 kJ)). The approach that we chose is promising to reduce food intake and could contribute to the development of an easy-to-use product for weight management.

LanguageEnglish
Pages86-94
JournalNutrition Research
Volume63
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2019

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Yogurt
Emulsions
Cross-Over Studies
Eating
Placebos
Lipids
Appetite
Breakfast
Meals
Healthy Volunteers
Body Mass Index
Randomized Controlled Trials
alginic acid
Weights and Measures
Food

Keywords

  • Appetite
  • Encapsulated lipid
  • Human trial
  • Ileal brake
  • Weight management

Cite this

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title = "Encapsulation of lipids as emulsion-alginate beads reduces food intake: a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over human trial in overweight adults",
abstract = "The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of lipid emulsions encapsulated in calcium-alginate beads in reducing food intake and appetite sensations. These emulsion-alginate beads were ingested in a yogurt (active) and compared to an equienergetic yogurt containing nonencapsulated nutrients with comparable sensory properties (control) in a randomized placebo-controlled trial with crossover design. Thirty-three healthy overweight volunteers (mean age: 43 years; body mass index: 27.7 kg/m2; 14 male) received the 2 treatments. Test days started with a standardized small breakfast (t = 0) followed by an active or control yogurt (t = 90 minutes). Appetite sensations and gastrointestinal symptoms were monitored prior to and after consumption of the yogurt, and food intake was measured during ad libitum pasta meal consumption (t = 210 minutes). The hypothesis for this study was that delayed release of encapsulated lipids suppresses appetite sensations and reduces food intake. Food intake was significantly reduced with 51 ± 20 kcal (213 ± 84 kJ) (P =.016) after intake of the active yogurt (770 ± 38 kcal (3222 ± 159 kJ)) compared to the control (821 ± 40 kcal (3435 ± 167 kJ)). The approach that we chose is promising to reduce food intake and could contribute to the development of an easy-to-use product for weight management.",
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Encapsulation of lipids as emulsion-alginate beads reduces food intake : a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over human trial in overweight adults. / Corstens, Meinou N.; Troost, Freddy J.; Alleleyn, Annick M.E.; Klaassen, Tim; Berton-Carabin, Claire C.; Schroën, Karin; Masclee, Ad A.M.

In: Nutrition Research, Vol. 63, 01.03.2019, p. 86-94.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Encapsulation of lipids as emulsion-alginate beads reduces food intake

T2 - Nutrition Research

AU - Corstens, Meinou N.

AU - Troost, Freddy J.

AU - Alleleyn, Annick M.E.

AU - Klaassen, Tim

AU - Berton-Carabin, Claire C.

AU - Schroën, Karin

AU - Masclee, Ad A.M.

PY - 2019/3/1

Y1 - 2019/3/1

N2 - The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of lipid emulsions encapsulated in calcium-alginate beads in reducing food intake and appetite sensations. These emulsion-alginate beads were ingested in a yogurt (active) and compared to an equienergetic yogurt containing nonencapsulated nutrients with comparable sensory properties (control) in a randomized placebo-controlled trial with crossover design. Thirty-three healthy overweight volunteers (mean age: 43 years; body mass index: 27.7 kg/m2; 14 male) received the 2 treatments. Test days started with a standardized small breakfast (t = 0) followed by an active or control yogurt (t = 90 minutes). Appetite sensations and gastrointestinal symptoms were monitored prior to and after consumption of the yogurt, and food intake was measured during ad libitum pasta meal consumption (t = 210 minutes). The hypothesis for this study was that delayed release of encapsulated lipids suppresses appetite sensations and reduces food intake. Food intake was significantly reduced with 51 ± 20 kcal (213 ± 84 kJ) (P =.016) after intake of the active yogurt (770 ± 38 kcal (3222 ± 159 kJ)) compared to the control (821 ± 40 kcal (3435 ± 167 kJ)). The approach that we chose is promising to reduce food intake and could contribute to the development of an easy-to-use product for weight management.

AB - The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of lipid emulsions encapsulated in calcium-alginate beads in reducing food intake and appetite sensations. These emulsion-alginate beads were ingested in a yogurt (active) and compared to an equienergetic yogurt containing nonencapsulated nutrients with comparable sensory properties (control) in a randomized placebo-controlled trial with crossover design. Thirty-three healthy overweight volunteers (mean age: 43 years; body mass index: 27.7 kg/m2; 14 male) received the 2 treatments. Test days started with a standardized small breakfast (t = 0) followed by an active or control yogurt (t = 90 minutes). Appetite sensations and gastrointestinal symptoms were monitored prior to and after consumption of the yogurt, and food intake was measured during ad libitum pasta meal consumption (t = 210 minutes). The hypothesis for this study was that delayed release of encapsulated lipids suppresses appetite sensations and reduces food intake. Food intake was significantly reduced with 51 ± 20 kcal (213 ± 84 kJ) (P =.016) after intake of the active yogurt (770 ± 38 kcal (3222 ± 159 kJ)) compared to the control (821 ± 40 kcal (3435 ± 167 kJ)). The approach that we chose is promising to reduce food intake and could contribute to the development of an easy-to-use product for weight management.

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KW - Ileal brake

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JF - Nutrition Research

SN - 0271-5317

ER -