Element fluxes through intensively monitored forest ecosystems in Europe and their relationships with stand and site characteristics.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper describes a European wide assessment of element budgets, using available data on deposition, meteorology and soil solution chemistry at 121 Intensive Monitoring plots. Input fluxes from the atmosphere were derived from fortnightly or monthly measurements of bulk deposition and throughfall, corrected for canopy uptake. Element outputs from the forest ecosystem were derived by multiplying fortnightly or monthly measurements of the soil solution composition at the bottom of the root zone with simulated unsaturated soil water fluxes. Despite the uncertainties in the calculated budgets, the results indicate that: (i) SO4 is still the dominant source of actual soil acidification despite the generally lower input of S than N, due to the different behaviour of S (near tracer) and N (strong retention); (ii) base cation removal due to man-induced soil acidification is limited; and (iii) Al release is high in areas with high S inputs and low base status.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)501-513
JournalEnvironmental Pollution
Volume148
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Keywords

  • regional assessment
  • acidic deposition
  • output fluxes
  • aluminum
  • soils

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Element fluxes through intensively monitored forest ecosystems in Europe and their relationships with stand and site characteristics.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this