Efficient detection of QTL with large effects in a simulated pig-type pedigree using selective genotyping

H.C.M. Heuven, J.W.M. Bastiaansen, S.M. Berg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background The ultimate goal of QTL studies is to find causative mutations, which requires additional expression studies. Given the limited amount of time and funds, the smart option is to identify the most important QTL with minimal effort. A cost-effective solution is to genotype only those animals with high or low phenotypic values or DNA-pools of these individuals. A two-stage genotyping strategy was applied on samples in the tails of the distribution of breeding values. Results The tail-analysis approach identified eight out of the 19 QTL in the first stage, explaining about half of 98% of the genetic variance. Four additional QTL with small effects were found in the second stage. Conclusion The two-stage genotyping strategy with selective genotyping detected regions with highly significant QTL useful for further fine-mapping. The large reduction in costs allows for follow-up expression and functional studies
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S8
JournalBMC Proceedings
Volume2009
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Efficient detection of QTL with large effects in a simulated pig-type pedigree using selective genotyping'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this