Effects of urban trees and shrubs on local air quality: which questions are unanswered?

A.A. Pronk, C.J. van Dijk, C. van Iperen

    Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

    Abstract

    Urban trees and shrubs are mentioned to remove air pollutants and therefore improve air quality. Two basic principles are commonly presented. First, wind flows are obstructed and forced upwards by green structures, mixed with clean air and subsequently concentrations are lowered. Directly behind a green structure concentrations can increase due to reduced wind flows. Second, pollutants are filtered within the trees and shrubs by sedimentation, impaction and or diffusion. In this case the air pollutants are more of less permanently removed as in the first case the pollution is simply diluted. Urban trees and shrubs are planted alongside Dutch roads and may form a closed canopy between houses in due time, called street canyon. When traffic is passing by underneath these closed canopies and airflow is obstructed subsequently, air quality may deteriorate. Recently, municipalities have developed a great interest to plant urban trees and shrubs to improve local air quality, but many questions are still unanswered. Frequently asked questions so far regard the efficacy of greens on local air quality as well as on design strategies for optimal results. In this project we investigate these questions through interviews and workshops. The questions are categorized, answered and published in a handsome booklet. The booklet includes information on the potency, benefits as well as on the pitfalls of urban trees and shrubs related to local air quality.
    Original languageEnglish
    Publication statusPublished - 2010
    EventLocal Air Quality and its Interactions with Vegetation, Antwerp, Belgium -
    Duration: 21 Jan 201022 Jan 2010

    Conference

    ConferenceLocal Air Quality and its Interactions with Vegetation, Antwerp, Belgium
    Period21/01/1022/01/10

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