Effects of nitrogen on accumulation and partitioning of dry matter and nitrogen of vegetables. 3. Spinach.

H. Biemond, J. Vos, P.C. Struik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Four greenhouse and 2 field experiments (the latter on a sandy soil) were carried out with different amounts and dates of N application to analyse the dynamics of dry matter and N accumulation in spinach (cv. Trias). Frequent measurements were carried out on dry matter and N accumulation in leaf blades, petioles and stems. The total accumulation of dry matter and N differed largely among and within experiments. Increasing N application increased yield of dry matter and N accumulation, whereas splitting N applications had much smaller effects. However, the partitioning of dry matter and N proved insensitive to N treatments. Harvest indices for dry matter (about 0.67) or N (about 0.74) of crops at a marketable stage were fairly constant over treatments and experiments. Increasing or splitting the N application affected N accumulation more than dry matter production, resulting in large effects on N concentrations. The lack of variation in response to N for different N regimes facilitates the development of N application techniques aimed at high yield, high quality and reduced emissions. The organic N concentration of leaf blades and petioles decreased with leaf age, although in most experiments this decrease was smaller at higher leaf numbers. The nitrate-N concentration decreased with increasing leaf number at any sampling date; it was higher when N was abundant. High yields in autumn crops were associated with high nitrate concentrations but also with potentially high losses of N.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)227-239
JournalNetherlands Journal of Agricultural Science
Volume44
Publication statusPublished - 1996

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Spinacia oleracea
dry matter partitioning
spinach
Vegetables
Nitrates
dry matter accumulation
Nitrogen
vegetables
petioles
leaf blade
nitrogen
nitrates
leaves
Soil
crops
harvest index
sandy soils
autumn
greenhouses
stems

Cite this

@article{66e32c7152644778a14dcf1defd0b256,
title = "Effects of nitrogen on accumulation and partitioning of dry matter and nitrogen of vegetables. 3. Spinach.",
abstract = "Four greenhouse and 2 field experiments (the latter on a sandy soil) were carried out with different amounts and dates of N application to analyse the dynamics of dry matter and N accumulation in spinach (cv. Trias). Frequent measurements were carried out on dry matter and N accumulation in leaf blades, petioles and stems. The total accumulation of dry matter and N differed largely among and within experiments. Increasing N application increased yield of dry matter and N accumulation, whereas splitting N applications had much smaller effects. However, the partitioning of dry matter and N proved insensitive to N treatments. Harvest indices for dry matter (about 0.67) or N (about 0.74) of crops at a marketable stage were fairly constant over treatments and experiments. Increasing or splitting the N application affected N accumulation more than dry matter production, resulting in large effects on N concentrations. The lack of variation in response to N for different N regimes facilitates the development of N application techniques aimed at high yield, high quality and reduced emissions. The organic N concentration of leaf blades and petioles decreased with leaf age, although in most experiments this decrease was smaller at higher leaf numbers. The nitrate-N concentration decreased with increasing leaf number at any sampling date; it was higher when N was abundant. High yields in autumn crops were associated with high nitrate concentrations but also with potentially high losses of N.",
author = "H. Biemond and J. Vos and P.C. Struik",
year = "1996",
language = "English",
volume = "44",
pages = "227--239",
journal = "Netherlands Journal of Agricultural Science",
issn = "0028-2928",
publisher = "Koninklijk Landbouwkundige Vereniging/Royal Netherlands Society of Agricultural Sciences",

}

Effects of nitrogen on accumulation and partitioning of dry matter and nitrogen of vegetables. 3. Spinach. / Biemond, H.; Vos, J.; Struik, P.C.

In: Netherlands Journal of Agricultural Science, Vol. 44, 1996, p. 227-239.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of nitrogen on accumulation and partitioning of dry matter and nitrogen of vegetables. 3. Spinach.

AU - Biemond, H.

AU - Vos, J.

AU - Struik, P.C.

PY - 1996

Y1 - 1996

N2 - Four greenhouse and 2 field experiments (the latter on a sandy soil) were carried out with different amounts and dates of N application to analyse the dynamics of dry matter and N accumulation in spinach (cv. Trias). Frequent measurements were carried out on dry matter and N accumulation in leaf blades, petioles and stems. The total accumulation of dry matter and N differed largely among and within experiments. Increasing N application increased yield of dry matter and N accumulation, whereas splitting N applications had much smaller effects. However, the partitioning of dry matter and N proved insensitive to N treatments. Harvest indices for dry matter (about 0.67) or N (about 0.74) of crops at a marketable stage were fairly constant over treatments and experiments. Increasing or splitting the N application affected N accumulation more than dry matter production, resulting in large effects on N concentrations. The lack of variation in response to N for different N regimes facilitates the development of N application techniques aimed at high yield, high quality and reduced emissions. The organic N concentration of leaf blades and petioles decreased with leaf age, although in most experiments this decrease was smaller at higher leaf numbers. The nitrate-N concentration decreased with increasing leaf number at any sampling date; it was higher when N was abundant. High yields in autumn crops were associated with high nitrate concentrations but also with potentially high losses of N.

AB - Four greenhouse and 2 field experiments (the latter on a sandy soil) were carried out with different amounts and dates of N application to analyse the dynamics of dry matter and N accumulation in spinach (cv. Trias). Frequent measurements were carried out on dry matter and N accumulation in leaf blades, petioles and stems. The total accumulation of dry matter and N differed largely among and within experiments. Increasing N application increased yield of dry matter and N accumulation, whereas splitting N applications had much smaller effects. However, the partitioning of dry matter and N proved insensitive to N treatments. Harvest indices for dry matter (about 0.67) or N (about 0.74) of crops at a marketable stage were fairly constant over treatments and experiments. Increasing or splitting the N application affected N accumulation more than dry matter production, resulting in large effects on N concentrations. The lack of variation in response to N for different N regimes facilitates the development of N application techniques aimed at high yield, high quality and reduced emissions. The organic N concentration of leaf blades and petioles decreased with leaf age, although in most experiments this decrease was smaller at higher leaf numbers. The nitrate-N concentration decreased with increasing leaf number at any sampling date; it was higher when N was abundant. High yields in autumn crops were associated with high nitrate concentrations but also with potentially high losses of N.

M3 - Article

VL - 44

SP - 227

EP - 239

JO - Netherlands Journal of Agricultural Science

JF - Netherlands Journal of Agricultural Science

SN - 0028-2928

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