Effects of hindgut fermentation of non-starch polysaccharides on the stability of blood glucose and insulin levels and physical activity in empty sows

J.A. de Leeuw, A.W. Jongbloed, H.A.M. Spoolder, M.W.A. Verstegen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A fermentable non-starch polysaccharides (fNSP)-rich diet was previously shown to stabilise glucose and insulin levels and reduce physical activity in restricted-fed sows. Stable glucose levels may prevent interprandial hunger. Aim of the present study was to elucidate the specific role of fermentation in these traits. Ten empty sows were either fed a low- (L-sows) or a high-fNSP diet (H-sows), twice daily. In three successive periods, sows received first no infusion and then, in different sequences, continuous fNSP infusion in the cecum or glucose infusion in the blood for 8 days each (GLU; energetic control). Infused energy was similar to the difference in energy derived from fNSP between diets. Blood samples, drawn between feeding times, were analysed for glucose and insulin levels and stability. Video-recordings were analysed for posture changes (physical activity). GLU and fNSP infusions stabilised glucose levels in L-sows and reduced posture changes in both L- and H-sows (H-sows, tendency). Insulin stability was less affected by infusions. GLU and fNSP infusions prevented drops of glucose below basal levels. fNSP infusion in L-sows (cecum) had similar effects as GLU infusion in H-sows (oral fNSP intake). Results imply that fermentation plays an important role in the effects of a fNSP-rich diet on the stability of glucose levels and physical activity in sows
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)165-174
JournalLivestock Production Science
Volume96
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Keywords

  • volatile fatty-acids
  • free-feeding rats
  • dietary fiber
  • pregnant sows
  • energy-metabolism
  • growing pigs
  • performance
  • behavior
  • chain

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